Air layering

Hinotori

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Do you use this for air layering? Would you try it in the heat of summer? I can get some willow.

I've only used it on common house plants. I've never air layered a tree. It works nicely for cuttings.

Only air layering I've done outside is on blackberries and those follow different rules. I can prune and do minor break repairs but that's all the tree experience I have.
 

Hinotori

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What about the leaves?

It's in the bark. Remember to remove the cambium layer as well since that's what is really wanted. That's too much effort for me which is why I just use the softer tips which blend. More surface area in contact with the water. I have many hundreds of swamp willows so I spread it out.

Older parts don't have as much which is why it needs to be fresh growth. Spring growth is supposed to be best.
 

Larsen Poultry Ranch

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Well, 8 air layering pods applied. I will check them in 2-4 weeks. I couldn't find the rooting powder so it's just the damp moss stuff. I soaked it in a bucket and squeezed the water out then packed into the pods.

2 on the lilac:
View attachment 15939View attachment 15938
2 on the jasmine:
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1 on a guava:
View attachment 15942
And 3 on avocados:
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The first avocado I started from seed several years ago, and it has a lot of low branches that need to come off to make it more tree shaped. The second avocado was also from seed but for some reason it grew two trunks up instead of one, so the smaller is hopefully going to be air layered.

I hope they make it! The branches I chose on the guava and avocados have to go, so it they don't succeed air layering I will just cut them off. The lilac is an attempt to save some of the plant before it gets removed. Same with the jasmine. Those two are too close to the house, and where we want to have a future addition to the house.
I still haven't popped the pods open to check officially, but the ones on the lilac look ok, no wilting. The jasmine pods also look ok, but I think the whole plant is stressed from the heat. The guava appears to have wilted and possibly died, the parent plant is happy and has new leaves, so I think I just failed at doing the air layering. The first avocado (with two pods) looks like both air layers failed, the branches are wilted and black looking; parent plant looks fine. The second avocado has new leaves on both the untouched stalk/trunk and the air layered one, although the air layered one is growing much slower/smaller.

I bought some more nursery pots this weekend so I'm hoping I can get the pods opened and the air layered plants into their own containers this week but I was hoping it would be a little cooler first. This 100 degree week has been brutal.
 

Larsen Poultry Ranch

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I still haven't popped the pods open to check officially, but the ones on the lilac look ok, no wilting. The jasmine pods also look ok, but I think the whole plant is stressed from the heat. The guava appears to have wilted and possibly died, the parent plant is happy and has new leaves, so I think I just failed at doing the air layering. The first avocado (with two pods) looks like both air layers failed, the branches are wilted and black looking; parent plant looks fine. The second avocado has new leaves on both the untouched stalk/trunk and the air layered one, although the air layered one is growing much slower/smaller.

I bought some more nursery pots this weekend so I'm hoping I can get the pods opened and the air layered plants into their own containers this week but I was hoping it would be a little cooler first. This 100 degree week has been brutal.
One possible reason the three pods failed and the others didn't (besides lack of rooting hormone) is that those pods were either in direct sunlight or only partial shade. The other pods are almost all fully shaded. I bet they got cooked/dried out.
 

CrealCritter

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One possible reason the three pods failed and the others didn't (besides lack of rooting hormone) is that those pods were either in direct sunlight or only partial shade. The other pods are almost all fully shaded. I bet they got cooked/dried out.
Thanks for posting the updates... I suspect you're correct...sun & 100 degrees are probobly not the ideal conditions for air layering sucess. I was just thinking yesterday, I should take a turkey baster and a bucket of pond water and water all mine. See if I can't get some water into the balls trough the opening on the top. I do have some horizontal air layers also but I'll see what I can do to water them. Where there is a will, there is a way, I reckon.

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CrealCritter

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I just took some pond water and a turkey baster and watered mine. I put a little powdered rooting hormone in the bulb and sucked water out of the bucket. Shook well and watered the top of the root balls. So far all look good, deer have been eating on the peach tree but I think they will be alright. Nothing I can do now anyways, now that the deer done got a tasty snack.

Here's the two worst apple trees. New green growth amazingly. Trees are in horrible shape, old. I guess that happens when you get old.
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Jesus is Lord and Christ 🙏❤️🇺🇸
 

Lazy Gardener

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You all have me chomping at the bit to do some air layering. I have enough projects to keep me busy here until late fall, without taking on more! Will wait until spring, Lord willing.

I have a little seedling that I'm growing on in a pot. Can't figure out whether it's apple or pear. So, when it gets to grafting stage, I'll probably cleft graft apple + pear!

I also have a Turkey Fig. Bought the bare root several years ago, and have been growing it in a pot b/c our winters are not conducive to keeping it alive if it's soil planted. I'd love to try air layering that. Could layer the top. That would accomplish 3 goals: Fun project. Prune the parent plant back to a less top heavy/more pot friendly size. Give me a new plant that would then need to be babied... or given away.

Then, I have an apple tree that is suckering from nursery root stock. Some layers of that would provide more nursery root stock plants to graft!
 

Larsen Poultry Ranch

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I tried to take some pictures last night of the good avocado air layer, I think it was a little too late in the evening so the pictures are crud. But, I think there were some little tiny nubbins of roots thinking about growing. I make sure to water the pod each time I water the plant and I think it's working to keep the pod moist.
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CrealCritter

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I tried to take some pictures last night of the good avocado air layer, I think it was a little too late in the evening so the pictures are crud. But, I think there were some little tiny nubbins of roots thinking about growing. I make sure to water the pod each time I water the plant and I think it's working to keep the pod moist.
View attachment 16193View attachment 16194

I want to say the technically correct term is Root Nodules and is the first sign you may just have a successful air layer. The roots form from the top part of the bark, first nodules, then hairy looking roots.The top is meaning the branch that will become the parent clone or new plant. The reason you take about 1 1/2" wide ring of bark off is to prevent the wound from gulling over and not rooting.

Here's a pretty good article on roses. Air laying roses is how I cut my teeth on air layering. This article uses a plastic soda bottle and tin foil instead of rooting balls.

Jesus is Lord and Christ 🙏❤️🇺🇸
 
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