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Any Experience: Trenchless Sewer Line Repair Re-Piped?

Discussion in 'Everything Else Homestead Living' started by Nifty, Jan 17, 2016.

  1. Jan 17, 2016
    Nifty

    Nifty Almost Self-Reliant Administrator

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    Every year our old terracotta sewer line gets plugged with tree roots and we have to have it rootered out. A huge mess, super inconvenient, and costly.

    I hear radio ads for trenchless re-piping and was wondering if anybody has had it done? A few years ago I got a bunch of general quotes. They range from $3,500 - $7,000 for a 50 foot "pull" of high grade plastic line. That doesn't include city permits which are probably another $1,500. At the time I decided to just deal with it when it happens... but it happened yet again, and this time it was really gross! [​IMG]

    We went about 2 years with no problems, but this year we had it back up 6 months ago and again today. I think we're going to have to bite the bullet and get it done.

    So, anybody ever have this done? Any thoughts or comments?
     
  2. Jan 17, 2016
    rhoda_bruce

    rhoda_bruce Almost Self-Reliant

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    When my grandparents tree roots were interfering with their septic system, they opted to having the tree cut down and added some field drains. It still feels like that tree would be there.
    I'm probably having a related problem, and would need to most likely start over with a new septic tank, but I'm opting for installing a privy, taking very short showers and doing whatever possible to avoid flooding my back yard. If I have to include the permit office in anything, I loose my grandfather privileges.
    Maybe if all around your septic tank you can put a bunch of plastic drums and fill them with glass bottles from bars and if the drum has a few holes drilled in the sides, it would allow for drainage and protect the septic system. Then just cover the drums with a tarp or tar paper and bury. I like to stay under the radar.
     
  3. Jan 17, 2016
    Nifty

    Nifty Almost Self-Reliant Administrator

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    Thanks for the great reply!

    Yes, it's tree roots getting into the sewer line that drains from our house to the main city sewer line.

    We definitely don't want to cut down the trees,especially since we're not sure exactly which ones might be causing the problem.

    I think we're going to have to bite the bullet and just get the line replaced, or just have someone come out every 6 months and pro-actively root the line clear.
     
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  4. Jan 17, 2016
    baymule

    baymule Sustainability Master

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  5. Jan 17, 2016
    rhoda_bruce

    rhoda_bruce Almost Self-Reliant

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    Well, that should let you know which tree is the problem for sure.
     
  6. Jan 17, 2016
    baymule

    baymule Sustainability Master

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    According to the article, the poison only kills the roots that are in the pipe, not the tree. So he would get to keep his trees!
     
  7. Jan 17, 2016
    Denim Deb

    Denim Deb More Precious than Rubies

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    What kinds of trees do you have? Willow is a horrible one to have any place near water. It needs to be at least 50 ft. away from any source of water.
     
  8. Jan 17, 2016
    Nifty

    Nifty Almost Self-Reliant Administrator

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    We have a sycamore that's right by the sewer line, but people say it's probably also the mulberry that's a bit further away, but known to be terrible with aggressive roots.
     
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  9. Jan 17, 2016
    Denim Deb

    Denim Deb More Precious than Rubies

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    I'd lean more towards the sycamore. They like water.
     
  10. Jan 18, 2016
    Britesea

    Britesea Sustainability Master

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    Liquidamber is also really bad about chasing down water
     

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