Bananas - Naturally ripened vs. Chemically ripened - How to tell the difference

FarmerJamie

Mr. Sensitive
Joined
Dec 22, 2010
Messages
5,599
Reaction score
1,131
Points
353
So I looked it up. Ethylene is used. Same chemical as if the bananas ripened in a paper sack (Which does speed up the process).

So from what I can tell, the same chemical causes the ripening, just in one case, the amount is concentrated to accelerate the process.

So unless some other chemical used, I am not sure why there would be a concern?

:idunno
 

Lazy Gardener

Super Self-Sufficient
Joined
May 14, 2017
Messages
2,399
Reaction score
2,159
Points
232
Location
Central Maine, Zone 4B
True, that. However, sometimes I'll eat a banana at the "perfect" stage of ripeness, and it will be dry, and completely void of flavor. This, in comparison to the creamy melt in your mouth texture, and the smooth awesome flavor of a perfect banana.

Nor, am I trying to argue. Just trying to place this bit of information in an appropriate brain file: does not matter vs. somewhat significant to my purchasing decisions.

We are all familiar with the difference between tree ripened peaches, and the bland pithy peaches often sold at the grocery store. And, a tomato which is shipped to the grocer before ripe pales in comparison to a vine ripened tomato.
 

Marianne

Super Self-Sufficient
Joined
Feb 6, 2011
Messages
3,268
Reaction score
340
Points
277
Location
rural Abilene, KS, 67410 USA
I just noticed that both bunch of bananas have the 'organic' sticker - so the 'chemical' can't be 'bad'.
We've had organic bananas that were lousy, but most of them have been pretty good. Maybe it depends on the season they had? Beats me.
 
Top