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Brine bucket

Discussion in 'The Homestead Kitchen - Recipes Etc' started by CrealCritter, Oct 15, 2018.

  1. Oct 15, 2018
    CrealCritter

    CrealCritter Super Self-Sufficient

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    Anyone use the 22 quart (5 1/2 gallon) Briner from LEM? Do you like it? It seems like a good idea with an adjustable locking plate that keeps meat submerged. At 12" diameter and 15 3/4" tall it doesn't seem like it would take up much space in the fridge. Plus it's made in the USA.

    https://www.lemproducts.com/product/briner-buckets/all-cooking
    Screenshot_2018-10-14-22-58-22.png

    Screenshot_2018-10-14-22-59-10.png

    I've got to get a large frozen bone in deer hind cooked soon. Someone (sorry I can't recall who) suggested I brine it in LEM backwoods cure first. So that's what I'm going to do. Then I'm going to smoke it.
    Screenshot_2018-10-14-23-12-20.png
     
    Last edited: Oct 15, 2018
  2. Oct 15, 2018
    Mini Horses

    Mini Horses Super Self-Sufficient

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    Let us know how it goes & tastes. I don't brine but, if I did want to, I'd probably use some of the containers I have already. Some are vacuum sealable. Even the bags, once sealed, you have submerged meat.

    Will the hind qtr fit in there? With my recent goat butcher, about the size of a deer, I doubt it would fit in it. Now, I deboned all and not brining, just saying -- in size comparison, wouldn't fit.
     
  3. Oct 15, 2018
    CrealCritter

    CrealCritter Super Self-Sufficient

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    I'm a complete newbe when it comes to brining meat. Marinate yes but brining no.

    I don't know if it'll fit to be honest and it's frozen solid so it would be different to de-bone unless I defrost it first. I should have de-boned it before I froze it, but time wouldn't allow me to.
     
  4. Oct 15, 2018
    frustratedearthmother

    frustratedearthmother Sustainability Master

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    I brine poultry - but haven't tried brining any other meat. Please let us know how it works out!
     
  5. Oct 15, 2018
    wyoDreamer

    wyoDreamer Almost Self-Reliant

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    @Mini Horses Your goat was about the size of a deer !!:ep:th
    Holy smokes, what kind of goats do you raise and what do you feed them?

    EDITTED TO ADD:
    Sorry, hope I didn't offend. My only experience with goats was my neighbors milk goats when i was just a kid. They were probably 30" tall (just a guess) - about the height of a desktop. I remember he had a milking platform that was over 12" tall for them to stand on so he could milk them comfortably when he sat on his stool - he had a bad back.
     
    Last edited: Oct 15, 2018
  6. Oct 15, 2018
    Hinotori

    Hinotori Super Self-Sufficient

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    I'm waiting to see how it goes too. I've only brined fish so that's a bit big for my use. Hubby does want me to try making bacon though
     
  7. Oct 16, 2018
    Mini Horses

    Mini Horses Super Self-Sufficient

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    May depend on what kind of deer you have. :D Around here they are white tailed and not huge. I'm going also by the guy who did the butcher and does so with his deer. He agreed that she was a big as a deer, and heavier. She was 3/4 Nubian and 1/4 Saanen, so a sizeable full sized animal. And, she was 18 months old, full grown. I have a LOT of great pasture and browse. Took 4.5-5# roasts and couple smaller ones, plus chopped from one hind. I'm no butcher but, I deboned and pretty well know where the parts are. The loins from the rib chops were about 18" long and had approx. 4# on each. Hey, these are NOT near as large as the Boers I used to raise! It took two of us to lift her onto the rack on the rear of his ATV and we had to tie her head & legs up to keep from dragging.

    I carried a hind section in on an 11X16 baking tray and it was hanging over big time on all sides. :idunno I didn't think she was an oversize, looked like my others.

    Now, this 10 month Boer buck is what I call a meat goat! He was a tame guy & gave me great babies.

    IMG_20160830_0001_NEW.jpg
     
    Hinotori and baymule like this.
  8. Oct 16, 2018
    wyoDreamer

    wyoDreamer Almost Self-Reliant

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    That does sound like a large goat - a lot bigger than my neighbors milk goats were.

    Our whitetail deer are on the larger size - being in northern Wisconsin, they need to be to get through the snow drifts in winter.
     
  9. Oct 16, 2018
    CrealCritter

    CrealCritter Super Self-Sufficient

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    Very fertile ground up there. I heard but have no proof it's true so this may be fake news... but the more fertile the ground the more nutrients are in the plants that deer graze on so the larger they grow.
     
  10. Oct 16, 2018
    wyoDreamer

    wyoDreamer Almost Self-Reliant

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    It is more likely a survival of the fittest. The bigger deer have the height to reach higher for graze, are able to travel through the snow covered fields better and may be able to pack on more body fat than short little deer.

    We have some pretty poor, sandy land around here. Glaciers removed all the good soil and left us with granite that breaks down into sand and clay.
     

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