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Building your dream homestead

Discussion in 'Everything Else Homestead Living' started by BarredBuff, Jun 14, 2018.

  1. Jun 14, 2018
    BarredBuff

    BarredBuff El Presidente de Pollo

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    So, I am now gainfully employed. I will be living at home and will have minimal bills each week. Primarily, a car payment, and gas. I expect to be able to save at least $1,500 a month (possibly more like $1,900).

    My goal is to now save up for a place of my own. I doubt this will come to fruition until at least three or four years pass. I know some of the things that I want available for the land. However, I want to know what you would look for if you were buying a place to live a self-reliant lifestyle.

    What would be the make or break for the land?

    What are things you MUST have on your property?

    What are questions to ask realtors/previous owners?

    THANKS!
     
  2. Jun 14, 2018
    frustratedearthmother

    frustratedearthmother Sustainability Master

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    When we were looking I wanted fences! I hate building fences - but ended up fencing this place anyway. I also would love to have a water source..running water preferably. A nice mix of pasture and wooded and browse....some wildlife would be nice...maybe turkeys and/or deer in the vicinity. What to ask about...hmmm...taxes...mineral rights? Just few ideas...
     
    BarredBuff likes this.
  3. Jun 14, 2018
    milkmansdaughter

    milkmansdaughter Super Self-Sufficient

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    Find out what you're allowed to do with the land.
    Are you limited on animals? Are you allowed to build? Can you have bees? Is it in a flood plain or a wetland area? And what are the taxes? Are you allowed things like solar panels?
    We wanted chickens and rabbits, possibly fish. And we wanted a large garden, fruit and nut trees, grapes, and berry bushes. We also wanted a large shop. Eventually we want bees.
    Our place isn't super big, but we're allowed all we wanted, we have a 2 1/2 stall shop, a large garden area, multiple fruit and nut trees, and grape vines. We have all I can keep up with right now.
     
    BarredBuff likes this.
  4. Jun 14, 2018
    Mini Horses

    Mini Horses Super Self-Sufficient

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    First -- list what YOU want to have. Define amount, type, location of land. Consider what you could or could not do without. House, garage, shops, barns, etc. Rarely do we find "everything" so be able to flex.

    Water, mineral rights. Used to be it was a given, now with all the State laws & sales of certain "rights" you need to ask. Some areas have sold gas rights, etc.

    Easements! ANY...utility, passage, deeded or not. And watch for such things a not deeded but used

    If near any rivers, lakes, dams....flood plain. Check with county about type of land/soils, for any restrictions of use due to it being considered marshland, watershed, etc.

    Restrictions -- deeded or by virtue of state or local zoning. this office can give you property setbacks for building, any limits on livestock (kind & numbers), tell you what acreage you need to get what you want with animals.

    Perc test if septic. Some could cost a fortune to put in & maintain. Know up front. Usual well depth in the area. These can be big $$. If one there, get info on depth, water availability, quality -- test the water.

    Find a good real estate agent, familiar with farms & raw land.
    The seller pays their fee and they can be a true asset if good.

    ALWAYS buy OWNERS title insurance. That required by lenders is for them, expand to owners. Cheap & one time expense. Saves a loss of property if anyone "shows up from the past" with an unrecorded deed, wrong signatures, etc., etc.


    Sounds like you have a lucrative job. Cngrats! Now you say you will be living at home and only list car payments & gas. Can't believe you will be free there. Consider helping with utilities, at least. Parents often won't ask and often need the help. Just saying. :old
     
    Chic Rustler, BarredBuff and sumi like this.
  5. Jun 14, 2018
    BarredBuff

    BarredBuff El Presidente de Pollo

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    All good advice! Thanks!


    As for the bills, I just listed what I would be solely responsible for. We are splitting groceries, feed, phone bills, etc.
     
  6. Jun 14, 2018
    NH Homesteader

    NH Homesteader Super Self-Sufficient

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    Well you know, it sounds like BB's going to be feeding everyone a lot too! That counts :)

    Water, that's important. A stream or pond ia a great thing to have. Like FEM said, a mixture of grass and browse is great to have to cover whatever animals you choose to keep.

    I am spoiled living here. Water rightsr mineral rights ... I forget those are issues. Personally having to be on town water and sewer would be an issue for me. I want a septic and well.
     
    BarredBuff likes this.
  7. Jun 14, 2018
    BarredBuff

    BarredBuff El Presidente de Pollo

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    I doubt I will have to worry about water rights. We don't have many regulations. No zoning laws. Nothing.

    I need enough acreage to pasture some cattle, goats, and a horse or two. Here that isn't an issue. We have lots of rain and hot weather--- so pasture is usually vigorous. Then, of course, an acre or two to devote to garden space, orchard, berries, and small grains. I need some wooded areas to gather firewood, and need enough area to attract and retain deer and turkeys.

    I would want area to grow hay. Mainly, to grow my own to mulch my garden with and feed my animals overwinter. It would not have to be a lot of acreage for that. I don't want to overwinter very many. I would consider it a bonus really.

    I would prefer raw land without buildings because I want to do my own designing and building. The home site would need to be well off the road, and in private. The land would have to be usable for a septic system. I'd also want to drill a well to use, and develop a spring. I'd want to be able to dig a full basement to utilize for storm shelter, and setup a sizable pantry and cellar area.

    My goal is to save money and see what happens. I think 30 to 50 acres would be in my size range.
     
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  8. Jun 14, 2018
    frustratedearthmother

    frustratedearthmother Sustainability Master

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    Sounds awesome. You're young, smart, and driven enough with a good head on your shoulders. My bet would be that you accomplish those dreams!
     
  9. Jun 14, 2018
    moxies_chickennuggets

    moxies_chickennuggets Almost Self-Reliant

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    WTG BB!! If I were you, I would also be checking out local foreclosure home auctions. You can make a bigger purchase with lots less $$ that way. More $$ in your pocket to do whatever you want to do to the property then. :thumbsup
     
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  10. Jun 14, 2018
    tortoise

    tortoise Wild Hare

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    I looked for an established farm >20 acres with forest for hunting. When we looked at the price of raw land or just a house on acreage versus an established farm, the established farms were a better value. Raw land up here is sold as recreational (hunting) land and sure is not cheap.

    I wanted sheep and goats and bought an 80 acre farm from someone who raised sheep and goats. Everything was set up, fenced, pasture established. They left farm tools and equipment for us, fence posts, shears, ear taggers, all kinds of small things which add up quickly in money when buying new or time when sourcing them otherwise. They had established a small orchard, which we've added to, but I'm thankful I didn't have to wait a decade to get some fruit.

    The hardest lesson I've learned is that money is not the only limitation. Time and energy are the most significant limitations. No matter how skilled and resourceful you are, there is only so much you can do at a time. Doing things "my way" is a strong motivator, but I'm certainly not the only person with good ideas on how to design and arrange a homestead. I'd suggest not ruling out established farms. You might get more bang for your buck, especially if you don't settle for one that isn't set up for what you want to do.
     
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