frost

Trying2keepitReal

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ok first winter with chickens--they are pets to the point of they have a job and we give them attention, definitely not the same level as the cat and dog but loved. So 1st cold night--the coop got down to 6 degrees, not too bad, they all survived :) There was frost on the ceiling and window--just enough to see not enough that it would drip if melted-no condensation at all. The walls are insulated and the bottom is made on a pallet with insulation in the slats and then a wood sealed floor. The ceiling is just metal. Is there not enough ventilation, too much, or I need to put up some insulation in the rafters? There is a 6ft by 6 inch vent along one side of the coop--south side. thanks
 

FarmerJamie

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Keeping things dry is most important. I always made sure there was some ventilation going on to prevent moisture build up.
Here, we would get sub zero Temps for a week or two typically. Single digits for a few weeks on and off.
Coop was not insulated and somewhat drafty. Lol. As long as the litter was dry and they had plenty of food and water, they did just fine
 

Trying2keepitReal

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so I need more ventilation?

edit: their temp was only 1 degree off from the outside temp so I am thinking it was just cold and not humid.
 

Alaskan

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so I need more ventilation?

edit: their temp was only 1 degree off from the outside temp so I am thinking it was just cold and not humid.
I would guess you need more ventilation, due to the frost... but being only 1 degree different from outside temps,maybe you just had high ambient humidity.

I live in a high humidity area. . High humidity outside.... high inside

:idunno

To know for sure about your ventilation, I would get a thermometer that also shows humidity.

If inside is the same or close to outside, you are fine.
 

Chic Rustler

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Keeping things dry is most important. I always made sure there was some ventilation going on to prevent moisture build up.
Here, we would get sub zero Temps for a week or two typically. Single digits for a few weeks on and off.
Coop was not insulated and somewhat drafty. Lol. As long as the litter was dry and they had plenty of food and water, they did just fine
this
 

Finnie

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To know for sure about your ventilation, I would get a thermometer that also shows humidity.

If inside is the same or close to outside, you are fine.
X2
 

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