1. Dismiss Notice
  2. Official SS Poll: What do you do to eliminate bills / cut down expenses?
    CLICK HERE!
    (if you are logged in, this notice can be dismissed using the "x" to the top right of the notice)

    Dismiss Notice
  3. 4 Thieves Vinegar - Featured Thread
    CLICK HERE!
    (if you are logged in, this notice can be dismissed using the "x" to the top right of the notice)

    Dismiss Notice
  4. SS Picture of the Week (POW) - Submit your Pics Now !!
    Click HERE!
    (if you are logged in, this notice can be dismissed using the "x" to the top right of the notice)

    Dismiss Notice

hey from Va.

Discussion in 'New Sufficient Self Member Introductions' started by LarryW, Jan 14, 2019.

  1. Jan 14, 2019
    LarryW

    LarryW Sustainable Newbie

    Joined:
    Jan 14, 2019
    Messages:
    3
    Likes Received:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    8
    looking to replace nasty cardboard boxes for storing canning jars. Lots of jars.

    We try to be self sufficient as much as possible.
     
  2. Jan 14, 2019
    Britesea

    Britesea Sustainability Master

    Joined:
    Jul 22, 2011
    Messages:
    3,895
    Likes Received:
    1,949
    Trophy Points:
    313
    Location:
    Klamath County, OR
    Are you talking about storing the empty ones, or the filled ones, or both? I read about one person who takes the cardboard boxes they come in and paints them with melted paraffin to extend the life of the boxes.
     
  3. Jan 14, 2019
    LarryW

    LarryW Sustainable Newbie

    Joined:
    Jan 14, 2019
    Messages:
    3
    Likes Received:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    8
    storing empty jars. I found a link , but when i tried to click to see the pics nothing happened. The post is from 2012 but shouldn't the pics be available since the text part is? I want to see what other have done so I don't have to reinvent the wheel. Thanks for the response.

    DIY wooden crates for storing canning jars
     
    canesisters likes this.
  4. Jan 14, 2019
    Beekissed

    Beekissed Mountain Sage

    Joined:
    Jul 12, 2008
    Messages:
    12,192
    Likes Received:
    2,551
    Trophy Points:
    417
    Location:
    Mountains of WV
    Nowadays I just put them back on the shelf from whence they came. Since usually all my jars are full each season, I'm not storing many empties. When I use a jar, I just move the filled jars up to take its place and place the empty in the back when washed.

    If I have more jars than I have shelf space, then I make more storage/shelf space. If I can't, then there's no reason to keep extra jars.

    :welcome Glad you came!
     
  5. Jan 14, 2019
    frustratedearthmother

    frustratedearthmother Sustainability Master

    Joined:
    Mar 11, 2012
    Messages:
    14,347
    Likes Received:
    6,478
    Trophy Points:
    403
    Location:
    USDA 9a
    What a unique idea! Probably not what you're looking for but so cool!

    Photo credit to Pinterest and theownerbuildernetwork.com

    [​IMG]


    Photo credit to Pinterest and theownerbuildernetwork.co
     
    sumi likes this.
  6. Jan 14, 2019
    canesisters

    canesisters Lovin' The Homestead

    Joined:
    Aug 27, 2012
    Messages:
    86
    Likes Received:
    106
    Trophy Points:
    93
    I would worry myself sick over that
     
    Lazy Gardener and Beekissed like this.
  7. Jan 14, 2019
    Beekissed

    Beekissed Mountain Sage

    Joined:
    Jul 12, 2008
    Messages:
    12,192
    Likes Received:
    2,551
    Trophy Points:
    417
    Location:
    Mountains of WV
    I was thinking the same thing. Accidentally bump that and jars come crashing to the floor. I can't imagine why one wouldn't just put up shelves where those metal thingies are and set the jars on a shelf...takes up the same space but a lot cheaper and more secure, plus it would utilize the space that is currently being wasted between the jar hangers.

    I'm thinking this was a guy with a lot of time and money on his hands, some shop tools he was dying to try out and a whole lot of overthinking things.
     
    Lazy Gardener likes this.
  8. Jan 14, 2019
    Lazy Gardener

    Lazy Gardener Super Self-Sufficient

    Joined:
    May 14, 2017
    Messages:
    1,673
    Likes Received:
    1,456
    Trophy Points:
    212
    Location:
    Central Maine, Zone 4B
    Agreed. I'm thinking: The weight! The weight! Peg board is not the sturdiest stuff in the world! Pretty, sure, but IMO not terribly practical over the long term.

    My big issue is that I don't have a place with stable temps. I find that when my filled jars have big temp fluctuation, the lids are always plinking. The seals never break, but this is worrisome to me. I'm now storing them in my "office" against the wall which is furthest from the heat source (usually wood stove, but the office also has a duct from forced air furnace. I keep that vent closed and covered.) Much less plinking in this location.

    Since I'm always collecting empty jars for future canning efforts, I do have lots of extras to store. Always on the look out for boxes from the grocer to recycle for jar storage. When a jar goes into storage, I try to always have a lid or plastic over it so it doesn't get dusty inside.

    I recycle my lids, and recycle jars and lids from the grocery store. Lids get carefully washed and stored for next use. I place an extra layer of protection over the lid when I open it wo the can opener doesn't ding it. My son bought me a set of Tattlers to trial. Looking forward to using those.
     
  9. Jan 14, 2019
    sumi

    sumi Sustainability Master Administrator

    Joined:
    Sep 26, 2013
    Messages:
    6,967
    Likes Received:
    5,188
    Trophy Points:
    327
    Location:
    Ireland
  10. Jan 14, 2019
    Beekissed

    Beekissed Mountain Sage

    Joined:
    Jul 12, 2008
    Messages:
    12,192
    Likes Received:
    2,551
    Trophy Points:
    417
    Location:
    Mountains of WV
    We just store ours upside down. Going to be washing those things really good anyway when next we can, so we don't do more than turn them upside down.

    I remember when my mother used to just store hers out on a hillside, open side pointing downward so they wouldn't fill with water, freeze and break. Those were jars we had to soak, wash, soak, and wash again in order to use. :D

    LG, I'd think your basement wouldn't have too much fluctuation of temps, would it? I store ours out in the pantry/mud room, which doesn't exactly have a heat source, nor is it cooled in the summer. I keep the door to it cracked a tiny bit to allow enough heat in the winter so the jars won't freeze, but there's a pretty good fluctuation in temps in that room throughout the year and even from morning to evening and my jars do alright.

    I do cover that nearby window to darken it and also hang an insulated curtain in front of the shelf to keep out the light, though.
     

Share This Page