Indoor Garden?

tortoise

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This conversation is renewing my interest in growing microgreens. My previous attempts were growing on a fiber mat (some kind of leftover quilt batting, it was too water-resistant and floaty too!), and then on soil. They grew just fine on soil, but my pets and kids would tip them so much I never got a harvest. I think it might be time to suck it up and buy some growing mats for microgreens.
 

frustratedearthmother

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I did grow some sprouts earlier this year - or was it last year? LOL! I used an organic seed starting mix and it worked pretty well. (No kids to knock 'em over here) I need to get some going again. I had radish sprouts, corn sprouts, broccoli sprouts and pea sprouts. I loved 'em! I had planned to start some again a while back and got totally sidetracked. Go figger, lol. I need to add it to my "get off your behind and get it done" list.
 

SprigOfTheLivingDead

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I happen to grow things inside over winter :)

plants.JPG
 

Lazy Gardener

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Depending on climate/growing zone/latitude, you can have fresh greens all year long. Check out Elliott Coleman's book: Four Season Harvest. Depending on what other projects I have going on, I do hydroponic gardening in the winter. Check out Kratky hydroponics. To be successful, you need lots of light. Even a shop light will suffice. Sprouting is an even easier way to have winter greens without much effort.
 

Daisy

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I have just had zero success with indoor growing. I'd love to have it work but there just doesnt seem enough light and Im not going to add to the electric bills when I go to town once a week anyway. Maybe I could look into solar light because they are cheap but im not sure if strong enough. Are there any issues with mould? Thats my other concern.

I have a very large back patio i wanted to set up aqua/hydroponics on but just havent been able to make any progress on it. The mozzies are brutal this season so I dont even want to spend time out there right now!
 

Lazy Gardener

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Mozzies? In your climate, I'd not bother with indoor growing. You should be able to grow outdoors year round... unless your summer season is too hot to grow things.
 

Daisy

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Mozzies? In your climate, I'd not bother with indoor growing. You should be able to grow outdoors year round... unless your summer season is too hot to grow things.

Yeah I agree. Its probably not worth the hassle. Mozzies = Mosquitoes. That was the only reason I tried indoor gardening cos my house rabbits cant eat much from the outside garden without getting the runs due to the variation in quality and disease risks. I go to town every week anyway, so while I have my ultra sensitive man bun, I'll just keep buying hydroponic grown from the store.
 

Lazy Gardener

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Growing your own hydroponic is not difficult, though it may be hard to keep up with a Bun. How much greens do you feed them? You might try growing oat fodder for them.
 

R2elk

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I have just had zero success with indoor growing. I'd love to have it work but there just doesnt seem enough light and Im not going to add to the electric bills when I go to town once a week anyway. Maybe I could look into solar light because they are cheap but im not sure if strong enough. Are there any issues with mould? Thats my other concern.

I have a very large back patio i wanted to set up aqua/hydroponics on but just havent been able to make any progress on it. The mozzies are brutal this season so I dont even want to spend time out there right now!
If you go with the new fluorescent LED fixtures with a daylight bulb, they are relatively inexpensive to operate. When I was using a standard fluorescent bulb, it cost me $5 a month to operate an 8' unit with two bulbs. With the LED unit, the light is even brighter and costs even less to run.

The 3 1/2" to 4" diameter tomatoes I was picking in my living room in January were worth the cost.
 
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