an off grid rocket cooktop

paul wheaton

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This is a special creation by Peter van den Berg, and enhanced by Kirk "Donkey" Mobert. It was further enhanced by the permaculture bootcamp here at wheaton labs.

Kirk insists that we cannot call this a "rocket" since there is no riser, but after having it for two years, I am simply choosing to call it a rocket anyway. Peter calls this design "the double shoebox".

This does feature a batch box with a "casserole door".

In the video, Jen points out that one spot has hit 1000 degrees F. And she points out that when she's not careful, she has burned some food. Cooking with a wood stove is a little different. You learn the hot spots and the medium spots and the cooler spots. And then there is also the matter of how much wood you are burning. So you want to boil water in the hottest spot. Or use the same spot, but less wood. Or, use a cooler spot on the cooktop. It really is that simple.

Here is a thread with a lot of details about the build


Here is the final product:

 

flowerbug

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i really like the surface being recycled and the door, but you must always have to be careful opening because that lid is going to be hot and also not to drop it on the floor. perhaps a safety chain on it? just thinking aloud here. :) wish i could play with fire more but the smoke would do me in. :(
 

paul wheaton

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Good eye! The surface came from an electric stove that was being thrown out. It was trimmed to be a little smaller, and some of that trimming was used to make the little viewing window on the front.

The door has been a massive improvement over some other doors for batch box rockets. But, yet, there are some tradeoffs. We recently ordered a lid made of the amber colored glass, which is supposed to be able to deal with temps in the range of 10,000 degrees F. We'll see what that is like.
 

YourRabbitGirl

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This is a special creation by Peter van den Berg, and enhanced by Kirk "Donkey" Mobert. It was further enhanced by the permaculture bootcamp here at wheaton labs.

Kirk insists that we cannot call this a "rocket" since there is no riser, but after having it for two years, I am simply choosing to call it a rocket anyway. Peter calls this design "the double shoebox".

This does feature a batch box with a "casserole door".

In the video, Jen points out that one spot has hit 1000 degrees F. And she points out that when she's not careful, she has burned some food. Cooking with a wood stove is a little different. You learn the hot spots and the medium spots and the cooler spots. And then there is also the matter of how much wood you are burning. So you want to boil water in the hottest spot. Or use the same spot, but less wood. Or, use a cooler spot on the cooktop. It really is that simple.

Here is a thread with a lot of details about the build


Here is the final product:

This is a pretty old thread but it still had my attention, which really looks so ancient. and I would love to make my own as well. I hope I can still receive a reply.
 

YourRabbitGirl

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This is a special creation by Peter van den Berg, and enhanced by Kirk "Donkey" Mobert. It was further enhanced by the permaculture bootcamp here at wheaton labs.

Kirk insists that we cannot call this a "rocket" since there is no riser, but after having it for two years, I am simply choosing to call it a rocket anyway. Peter calls this design "the double shoebox".

This does feature a batch box with a "casserole door".

In the video, Jen points out that one spot has hit 1000 degrees F. And she points out that when she's not careful, she has burned some food. Cooking with a wood stove is a little different. You learn the hot spots and the medium spots and the cooler spots. And then there is also the matter of how much wood you are burning. So you want to boil water in the hottest spot. Or use the same spot, but less wood. Or, use a cooler spot on the cooktop. It really is that simple.

Here is a thread with a lot of details about the build


Here is the final product:

I hope someone in this thread will help me with a better illustration of the fundamentals of building this stuff. too much to learn. so little information.
 
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