asparagus

CrealCritter

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We had a pretty nice asparagus patch at my in-laws. I recall making raised beds, we dig deep and back filled with rotted manure, when we planted the bare roots.

Unfortunately with my father in laws' ALZ. He couldn't tell the ferns from weeds and killed quite a few of them weeding. Then I think he just forgot all about them and pulled up the raised beds and flattened the area out with his tractor and box blade. The asparagus obviously didn't survive.

So now I would like to plant an asparagus patch of my own. What's your thoughts/experiences with different varieties? Should I do a block or a row? Full sun / part shade or shade? Soil PH?

Decisions decisions decisions & so much to discuss...

 
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Lazy Gardener

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I wish I could help you. I suggest you do a search on your County Ag. Cooperative Exchange site, and look up their articles about Asparagus. If you don't have an active Ag coop exch in your state, check out the ones that are in a similar climate. I spend a lot of time during winter "down time" reading up on those sites. Lots of good reads and videos. Everything from Animal husbandry to small gardens, and field management... perhaps even some good reads on tractor maintenance and purchase! I love Asparagus, but am not at all successful growing it. Most recent efforts: raised beds shared with strawberries. I don't have good land for growing asparagus. At least that's my excuse.
 

wyoDreamer

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Our place has tons of wild asparagus growing all over the place, mostly along the fence lines I notice. I am sure the fence line is an area that is undisturbed, so that is why it is growing there. It grows in full sun, as it needs the suns warmth to defrost the ground and get it to start growing so early in the spring.

You can buy all male plants or the old fashioned kind (like Marth Washington, which has both male and female plants). I guess the all male are a larger asparagus shoot and won't make baby plants which will make for smaller shoots because of overcrowding.

If you have a nice place for it, I would make a bed about 2' to 3' wide and as long as you want. It will make it easier for you to weed, pick aspargus and mulch with a narrower row. Plant 18" apart and don't harvest for 3 to 5 years.
 

Lazy Gardener

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i'VE ALSO heard of people digging those wild plants, harvesting the monster crowns for an instant bed, without having to wait the typical 3 years till first harvest.
 

CrealCritter

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Our place has tons of wild asparagus growing all over the place, mostly along the fence lines I notice. I am sure the fence line is an area that is undisturbed, so that is why it is growing there. It grows in full sun, as it needs the suns warmth to defrost the ground and get it to start growing so early in the spring.

You can buy all male plants or the old fashioned kind (like Marth Washington, which has both male and female plants). I guess the all male are a larger asparagus shoot and won't make baby plants which will make for smaller shoots because of overcrowding.

If you have a nice place for it, I would make a bed about 2' to 3' wide and as long as you want. It will make it easier for you to weed, pick aspargus and mulch with a narrower row. Plant 18" apart and don't harvest for 3 to 5 years.

Thank you for the reply 😊. Any thoughts on Jersey Knight ?


 
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Lazy Gardener

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I would definitely buy an all male variety. Of course... if you are thinking VERY LONG term... you might not mind having some plants that will self propagate! Of course, most likely, you can take root cuttings, and they will be quicker to establish than seedlings.

Check your personal e-mail
 

Mini Horses

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You can buy the older root stock, just costs more. IMO it's worth it. It's like fruit trees, I don't want to wait 5-7 yrs for fruit! So, I buy something ready to produce in a year.
 

R2elk

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Our place has tons of wild asparagus growing all over the place, mostly along the fence lines I notice. I am sure the fence line is an area that is undisturbed, so that is why it is growing there. It grows in full sun, as it needs the suns warmth to defrost the ground and get it to start growing so early in the spring. You can buy all male plants or the old fashioned kind (like Martha Washington, which has both male and female plants). I guess the all male are a larger asparagus shoot and won't make baby plants which will make for smaller shoots because of overcrowding. If you have a nice place for it, I would make a bed about 2' to 3' wide and as long as you want. It will make it easier for you to weed, pick asparagus and mulch with a narrower row. Plant 18" apart and don't harvest for 3 to 5 years.
The female shoots are bigger than the male shoots.

My asparagus bed is approximately 5' wide by 20' long. It started at 3' wide and keeps spreading from seeds.

I started with Martha Washington and Jersey Giant. Later I added Purple Passion. Now it is a mix of those plus hybrids created by the original plants. The hybrids have a distinctly different taste. The taste is just different and not any worse or any better than the originals.

There isn't anything comparable to asparagus picked fresh from the garden and then cooked to your preferences.
 
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