Best foodstuff to stockpile?

creativetwinszoo

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I wonder what the nutritional benefit of the spent grain would be for people? I know it's great for critters and a lot of people like using it if they can get it but how does one store something like that for extended time?.?

And possibly using that for bread sounds like a fun experiment! I wonder if for that it would be best to dry it out, powder/mash it and use it like flour in the bread? Would additional yeast be needed or would the yeast from the brew be enough? Many questions and curiosity's!!

It also sounds super fishy that their trying to regulate it if no one and nocritter has gotten sick ever from spent grain.
 

CrealCritter

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I wonder what the nutritional benefit of the spent grain would be for people? I know it's great for critters and a lot of people like using it if they can get it but how does one store something like that for extended time?.?

And possibly using that for bread sounds like a fun experiment! I wonder if for that it would be best to dry it out, powder/mash it and use it like flour in the bread? Would additional yeast be needed or would the yeast from the brew be enough? Many questions and curiosity's!!

It also sounds super fishy that their trying to regulate it if no one and nocritter has gotten sick ever from spent grain.
When they come out of the mash tun there is no yeast added at that point. They are just wet grains that have had the natural ensyimes (alpha & beta) activated, to convert the starch within the grain into sugars.

They taste a little sweet but nothing like the sweet sticky wort that I drain out of the mash tun. I would suspect long term storage would require, immediate freezing or dehydration. With dehydration I think one "might could" store in sealed jars with a few oxygen absorbers and grind into flour as needed. Although I've not done any of this, so I'm just guessing...
 
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CrealCritter

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bread-from-beer-grains.jpg


Brewer’s Bread Recipe
3cups spent grain (wet, straight from the mash tun)
1.25cups warm water
.25cups sugar
4-5cups all purpose flour
1tspn. salt
1egg beaten
.25cups milk
1packet dry active bakers yeast
Instructions:
  • Mix yeast water and sugar in a bowl to activate yeast. Allow 30 min for yeast to activate.
  • Add yeast starter, salt, egg, spent grain, and milk in a bowl and slowely add flour.
  • Knead dough until it is smooth and no longer sticky.
  • Place dough in a large greased bowl and cover it with a towel. Wait for dough to rise and double in size then punch down the dough.
  • Split your dough into the desired amount of loaves and place on a cookie sheet over a thin layer of cornmeal.
  • Allow loaves to rise again and then score the loaves with a knife.
  • Bake at 375ºF for 35 minutes or until the bread is desired color and a knife comes out clean after being inserted into the center.
Reference --->
 

Daisy

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Actually, you can make your own coconut milk from the shredded coconut. I've only done it once, because I already have several cans in my pantry.
From Wellness Mama's site:
Ingredients
Instructions
  • Heat water until hot, but not boiling.
  • Put shredded coconut in blender or Vitamix and add the hot water. If all the water will not fit, this can be done in batches.
  • Blend on high for several minutes until thick and creamy.
  • First, pour through a mesh strainer to remove most of the coconut solids. Then squeeze through a towel or several thicknesses of cheesecloth to remove remaining pieces of coconut.
  • If you had to split the water into batches put all the coconut that you strained out back in the blender, add the remaining water, and repeat.
  • Drink immediately or store in the refrigerator for up to 3-4 days after making for best flavor and texture. Since there are no preservatives or fillers, the "cream" of the coconut milk may separate on the top if stored in the fridge. Just shake or stir before using.

Thank! I figured it was possible, I just had never tried it before :)
 

creativetwinszoo

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When they come out of the mash tun there is no yeast added at that point. They are just wet grains that have had the natural ensyimes (alpha & beta) activated, to convert the starch within the grain into sugars.

They taste a little sweet but nothing like the sweet sticky wort that I drain out of the mash tun. I would suspect long term storage would require, immediate freezing or dehydration. With dehydration I think one "might could" store in sealed jars with a few oxygen absorbers and grind into flour as needed. Although I've not done any of this, so I'm just guessing...
Ah! My dad used to brew but doesnt anymore, hasnt in awhile so I dont know all the steps yet. Just knew yeast was something he used lol. I should get into brewing someday, sounds like it's a good to know skill and with that bread recipe could hit a couple birds with one stone 👍

Hrmmm that makes me curious if the dried ground stuff would make good noodles? Man I need to find some local brewers to become buddies with to sate my cooking curiosity!
 

CrealCritter

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Ah! My dad used to brew but doesnt anymore, hasnt in awhile so I dont know all the steps yet. Just knew yeast was something he used lol. I should get into brewing someday, sounds like it's a good to know skill and with that bread recipe could hit a couple birds with one stone 👍

Hrmmm that makes me curious if the dried ground stuff would make good noodles? Man I need to find some local brewers to become buddies with to sate my cooking curiosity!
I think, you would need to get the spent grain pretty quickly. Right after they are drained (sparged) If you wanted to bake with them. Time and temperature is of the essence here.

I suspect they would sour pretty fast, if left wet in the open air to long. Maybe I'm talking about something I shouldn't be? Sour mash rye whiskey.

But hey who knows... if they do sour, they might even make a good sourdough bread? IDK, I'm just guessing... I'm not much of a cook so take what I say with a grain of salt and proceed with caution...

My mom would always kick me out of the kitchen, so I never learned how to cook much of anything.

I'm going to brew up an Irish Red Ale next weekend. And decided I'm going to try and make some bread with the spent grains as per the recipe in my prior post. I'll let you all know how the Brewers Bread turns out when I do.

The malted grains I'll be mashing for the Irish Red Ale are Maris Otter, Caramel and light roasted Barley. Will they make a decent Brewers Bread IDK... But I'm going to find out.
 
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YourRabbitGirl

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As the title says, what do you consider the best foodstuff to stockpile? Considering things like essentials, stores well and long, etc.
Cheese. There's a lot of things you can do with it. may it be rice, bread, pasta, or noodles. you can always use cheese for you to make a satisfying meal.
 

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I will buy a large box of instant milk powder, and vac seal it in "mix a quart" sized portions. Years ago, we bought an instant milk powder called "Sanalac". It was fantastic, and even tolerable without adding anything extra if drank when chilled. But, I mixed it 1:1 with regular milk. It cut the milk bill considerably. What does the average consumer run to the store for? Milk, bread, eggs. I got the eggs covered, and can make bread. Powdered milk will keep us covered, and I bet we could go at least 2 months w/o visiting a store.
 

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