Britesea - Living the good life in rural Oregon

Britesea

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I've seen the same. I had a hen spend 6 weeks sitting on a nest of eggs with 0 results when we had an older rooster. Duke is getting close to that 4 year mark; I had planned on sending him to the Canner later this fall, but we may be doing it sooner (If we can find him; like I said, he's in hiding)
 

Mini Horses

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I have two old roosters who live together in their own little house and yard. Bought as day olds. 7 yrs this past Feb. When they became obviously the target, I removed them from their demise. They had always gotten along and still do, enjoying retirement. It's not what normally happens but. They were always gentlemen. Big, beautiful Marans. Expecting them to pass whenever but....

Have one more getting older and he's not being picked on, just is and has accepted being grandpa. 😁 He still wanders along. Half a pet. He's got a couple favorite hens to sun and dust bathe with And he still alerts to danger or food.
 

baymule

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Ive never had a nice rooster. I have one now that was part of Marans black sex links. He has a barred pattern, was black as a chick, so snuck in the group. He is already being bad, striking at the feed can and starting to be a pain. Freezer camp is on the horizon.
 

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Ive never had a nice rooster. I have one now that was part of Marans black sex links. He has a barred pattern, was black as a chick, so snuck in the group. He is already being bad, striking at the feed can and starting to be a pain. Freezer camp is on the horizon.
Have you tried schooling him in acceptable behavior? All my roos go to behavior management class, starting with the very moment I know they are boys. I always keep them arm's length away, don't let them eat until the ladies have eaten. Depending on their behavior, they may get daily or (whenever) training in the following lesson: The coop is mine. The hens are mine. The grass is mine. The chicken run is mine. The feed and water are mine. Basically, it all belongs to me, including the little patch of ground the cockerel happens to be standing on at the moment. He must yield space and life needs/wants/desires to ME. So, I will chase him with a little switch (tapping his tail feathers, or smacking the ground around him) I will herd him away from feed/water/girls, until I decide to let him approach those resources. Yielding to me instills passive behavior in him. When I am choosing next year's roo, I keep an eye on the grow out pen, and look for a youngster who starts warning calls and especially tidbitting behavior towards the girls (and even other cockerels) at an early age. It's also helpful to let the old biddies train those young cockerels. I might put a young "contender" into the chicken run all by himself, and let the biddies go a few supervised rounds with him.
 

Britesea

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Ours know better than to mess with DH, but I didn't think you could train them out of fighting each other.
 

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It has been my experience that roosters won't fight (much, if at all) if there are no ladies. I keep my cockerels in a grow out pen, beside the coop/run that houses my laying flock with their attendant roo. The cockerels do a bit of "establish pecking order" fighting, but do not do any "out to kill" fighting. I've kept 2 roos in the laying flock, and they generally get along UNTIL the younger one decides that HE wants to be the Alpha. I have almost always been able to cull the older roo before their relationship gets to the point of bloodshed. Of course, a lot depends on genetics. Some breeds are more aggressive than others. And, a lot depends on how they are housed: do they have plenty of space in coop and run, do they have plenty of options for "getting out of each other's sight". Of course, best option (which I am not able to provide) is free range.
 

baymule

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I’m considering White Plymouth Rocks for layers and meat. The roosters are reputed to not be so nasty mean. Was going to get chicke this past spring, but didn’t have a new coop built. Still haven’t built it…… lol
 

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@Beekissed has WPR, and, as far as I know, she will tell you that they are the best all round DP bird. If you want an easy build, especially, given your climate, consider building a cattle panel coop. You can even use T posts to hold the hoops in place. Bare soil construction is IMO the absolute best option for a coop b/c it lends it'self very well to deep composting litter.
 

baymule

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It’s because of Beekissed rave reviews that I want WPR. And I have a hoop coop. I built it on skids. I also have a couple other oops on skids, currently being used by 2 six month old rams as their barn, and the other one is a really big dog house. LOL

I want to build a walk in 12’X 20’ coop and run electricity to it. A permanent, posts in the ground, coop. Too hot now, I’ll do it this fall.
 
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