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Buying Meat on the Hoof for Dummies

Discussion in 'Cattle' started by Farmfresh, Jan 6, 2010.

  1. Jan 7, 2010
    Farmfresh

    Farmfresh City Biddy

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    Welcome to SS Cinebar! :frow

    Could you more give more of a description about that mobile "slaughter truck"?

    I have a cousin that is currently working to equip one of those.
     
  2. Jan 7, 2010
    Cinebar

    Cinebar Power Conserver

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    Thanks for the welcome. :)

    I didn't have much to do with the slaughter truck but I remember when my boss had to equip one to replace the one he had sold (there's a story behind that) how expensive it was.

    Obviously, it had a refrigerator system and hooks (hydraulic?) to lift the animals off the ground to be butchered and then to move the sides and/or quarters into the truck.

    "Gut barrels" (the name speaks for itself) also accompanied the truck. The gut barrels, when the truck would return to the shop, would then go into the "gut cooler" to await pickup by the rendering guy.
     
  3. Jan 7, 2010
    ORChick

    ORChick Almost Self-Reliant

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    Wildsky - check out old cookbooks for organ meat recipes - old, like 70's and before. I have a stuffed heart recipe from a cookbook written in the early 70's; one of the authors was a friend of my mother's, and she (the author) suggested that I try heart. I liked it, hubby didn't, so I haven't done it since :/. I would though, if I ever find heart again. I'll post it in the recipe section. I would imagine that it would also be good ground up, and added to meatloaf - start with a little, and move up to "tolerance level" :lol:. And I know that back in the "old days", before canned pet food, some of the more obscure organ meats (lungs, spleen, etc.) were given away, or sold for very little, as pet food.
     
  4. Jan 7, 2010
    ORChick

    ORChick Almost Self-Reliant

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    FarmFresh, thanks for starting this thread; I've been thinking that this is the year to clean out the freezers, and find a source for good meat, and am glad for all the expert advice.
    Another one of my old books that might be interesting to some reading this thread is called "Cutting Up in the Kitchen - the butcher's guide to saving money on meat and poultry", by Merle Ellis - Chronicle Books 1975. The author was a butcher, and does a really good job of explaining various cuts, and how to buy a larger piece, and cut it up yourself, among other things. I found this first in the library, but bought it when I saw it in a second hand shop. http://www.amazon.com/Cutting-Up-Kitchen-Merle-Ellis/dp/0877010714
     
  5. Jan 7, 2010
    sufficientforme

    sufficientforme Almost Self-Reliant

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    :pop I am reading this with great interest as I have never taken the plunge and always buy after someone has already done all the work. We are hoping to trade turkey and lamb in the future.
     
  6. Jan 7, 2010
    SKR8PN

    SKR8PN Late For Supper

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    When I cook a beef tongue, I boil it for about an hour in a light brine, pull it out and after it has cooled enough to handle, I "peel" it to get a the grainy surface flesh off and slice it about a 1/4 inch thick. I then finish it off in the oven for another half hour or so, in a red wine. After that you can either eat it as is, save it for sandwich meat, or even fry it up later.
     
  7. Jan 7, 2010
    hwillm1977

    hwillm1977 Almost Self-Reliant

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    That's a good idea... I was going to ask the neighbours if they use the beef tongues, my dad loves them but usually buys them pickled in jars... I had no idea what to do with fresh ones, but the red wine sounds great.

    I remember being so grossed out as a kid by watching my grandmother peel the taste buds off the tongues to eat them...
     
  8. Jan 7, 2010
    Occamstazer

    Occamstazer Almost Self-Reliant

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    Love the red wine idea! I did peel mine, of course, but something was off in the boil. I will try this next time.
     
  9. Jan 7, 2010
    Farmfresh

    Farmfresh City Biddy

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    I invite both of you to check out a previous thread It sounds Offal-ly good to me! and PLEASE add your variety meat recipes to the thread for easy referral!
     
  10. Jan 7, 2010
    Farmfresh

    Farmfresh City Biddy

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    Please post this one on the offal thread as well!
     

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