Can you identify this bush?

Britesea

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I've heard of a chokeberry called "aronia"... native to the US, but it became very popular in eastern Europe and Russia. You can't eat them fresh, but they apparently make a very tasty jelly. Apparently one of those "superfoods" too. I don't know if that's what you have though...
 

Lazy Gardener

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After doing a google search, I determined that there are many different trees/shrubs called choke cherry... most likely dependent on what area of the country they are grown in. We had a whole "wild" hedge of them where I grew up. They grew in a long pannicle. Super bitter. We never did anything with them, but I've heard of them being used for jelly. Maybe even wine.
 

Mini Horses

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Definitely not pokeberry. Had those everywhere and the goats have taken care of them by eating young leaves. :)
BUT...at that site I spotted another plant and working thru a lot it appears that this "may" be ALONG THE LINE of something in the family of Araliaceae….American Spikenard, Aralia rocaece(SP) or something like that. So, ginsing is in the same aralia party. Wild sasparilla, another. Nothing is perfect for this plant I see BUT, this is the closest grouping I have found.

Tomorrow I will better inspect the stems & leaves to see if it matches up with some of the things in these threads I have gone to. It's just a thing that has me wanting to know, now that it hasn't been easy. :lol: Too many relatives out there for this.
 

YourRabbitGirl

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We always called those "sarvice berries" (hillbilly lingo)but others call them serviceberries...the bears and birds love them. Not sure if that's what they truly are but that's what we've always known them as.

https://www.thespruce.com/nine-species-serviceberry-trees-and-shrubs-3269674
I wonder how they taste... Wait... Are they edible? they sure look delicious. they look like a smaller version of blueberries. Well... If bears like them I bet they're edible.
 

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