composting

Britesea

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I'm lazy. I made several bins using concrete blocks with gaps for air. Fill one up and let it sit. Occasionally I throw some water on it if it seems dry beyond the top (no turning). When one is full, I start the next. It generally takes about a year for them to finish this way, but it works for me.
 

Trying2keepitReal

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I'm lazy. I made several bins using concrete blocks with gaps for air. Fill one up and let it sit. Occasionally I throw some water on it if it seems dry beyond the top (no turning). When one is full, I start the next. It generally takes about a year for them to finish this way, but it works for me.
This would definitely be a way to start for me---I will have to pencil in turning time otherwise.
 

flowerbug

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another simple way is to just bury stuff and then you won't need to do anything with it again. it isn't as fast as hot composting but nature will sort it out eventually. this is what i do with almost all of my garden debris and any extra organic materials i can come across and it fits in with my low-till garden regimen.

the downsides are that it will not get hot enough to destroy weed seeds and the few bits of some garden weed roots that i have to either isolate (dig down deep enough and put a layer of cardboard or some newspaper over it) or bury it deeply enough that it won't resurface or i just get it again when it does try to come up.

the upside. i have layers of organic materials stashed away in some gardens that have been down there for years and once in a while i dig them up as i'm going through the garden space and they get mixed in more with the rest of the garden soil. these areas also act as worm refuge spaces for the times when it gets too hot, cold or too dry. oh and yeah, a lot less messing around. i only dig that once and then the next time i'm digging in another area until i rotate through the garden space.
 

flowerbug

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Hmmmm...this I didn't know, more research tomorrow

you'll need a pretty big pile to get much heat from it, but if you can take the edge off cold water before having to heat it further that is better than nothing. :) if you're going for a hot pile to kill weed seeds and certain disease microbes you'll have to monitor the temperature and also rotate the pile.
 

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