East Texas Gardening

The Pagan Pig

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We need some of that rain here, bad! The effects of the drought from last year are still here, and now this year it seems that the drought is going to continue. Had very few walnuts last year, and no acorns, which is the first time since being here for 10 years.

East Texas does seem like a nice place, if one is going to be in Texas. Are there many or few creeks or rivers in your area @The Pagan Pig?
We suffered with drought for years here until last year. Now it seems to be the opposite with more rain than we need. At least the wild hogs have moved back down to the river bottoms and are leaving us alone .... hate those things.

Lake Sam Rayburn and Toledo Bend are the two big lakes that are within an easy drive of us and we have numerous small lakes and rivers. We are up on a hill so we don't have to worry about flooding like the river folks do.
 

Mini Horses

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In my part of VA it's been real dry for a couple weeks. I had to water the garden TO PLANT! Just so dust bowl dry. After watering, the color of dirt and chunks of debris became real obvious. 🤔 Way more to pick and burn. Bummer!

Did plant, after watering a long time.
 

baymule

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They just announced here that there will be ZERO, ZIP, NADA irrigation water available for farmers in Klamath Basin this year... But nothing about limiting water to residential so they can have their green lawns and azaleas. What are they thinking?
We saw that on the news last night. Screw the farmers, let them go broke and sell out. Let their farms be scooped up for pennies on the dollar by real estate developers, who can then build more subdivisions for more people. Total insanity.

I don’t know why the west coast doesn’t have desalination plants to harvest fresh water. Then there would be enough for everyone. Oh, wait. What was I thinking? That would make sense and the governors of those states don’t have any.
 

baymule

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Do you have that real sandy loam soil where you are? We do, so the garden drains fast and drys out fast but this is still just too much water for the plants. If it wasn't for the sandy loam we wouldn't have a garden left out there at all.
We have what is locally called, sugar sand. White, devoid of nutrients and humus. Think beach without the ocean. When wet, it is firm, when dry (2 minutes after it quits raining) it is dust. We moved here in February 2015 and put in a spring garden which was a dismal failure. LOL We have thrown everything at the garden we got our hands on. Sheep, horse and chicken manure, and compost. A power line cleaning company brought us 110 loads of wood chips and we let them park their trucks here at night. We used those chips EVERYWHERE. When the wind blew, it kicked up drifts of dust that covered everything. We covered the yard, horse barnyard, garden and driveway. Last year, that crew brought us 11 loads, we are almost out now.

Our garden is a foot deep in rich black soil. It takes continuous amendments to keep it going. We get nice harvests and if we can fight off the weeds, we get even better harvests. LOL

What do you use to amend your sandy soul?
 

The Pagan Pig

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Like the machine that milk comes from? Yeah, green lawns and washed cars are real important! :he
Yeah ...... who needs flatulent cows when you have a milk machine located on a nice green manicured plot with abundant azaleas to admire as the machine fills up you milk pitcher. :idunno
 

The Pagan Pig

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What do you use to amend your sandy soul?
Shred up all the oak and hickory leaves every year and till them in. We have some sugar sand here too, but not a lot. Our soil has a lot of fine clay mixed in so it does retain water fairly well but you still have to add stuff to make it better.
 
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