Encourage your daughters.

CJ1

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I'm not exactly sure if this is the proper place to put it. But because it does have to do with financial stability I figured it does.

Like I said before I don't have kids yet. But I know the kind of mother I want to be.

I'm sure that everyone who has kids had told them that they can be anything they want when they grow up. But I suggest that we take it a step farther.

Instead of simply supporting their decisions in their chosen career field I'm saying we need to steer young women toward those careers that are not only fulfilling but offer outstanding financial opportunities.

My father did that with me. And it worked out fantastically. No, I'm not in my dream job yet. But I have chosen fields and made decisions that over the course of the last five years have allowed me to put more than half down on my land and will hopefully allow me to do nothing but grow my food and what not while making money off my land before I'm 25 or 26. No. I'm not trying to toot my own horn or anything. I'm just trying to explain what can happen when you properly motivate a young woman.

I know that this is not a political type forum and am not trying to turn this into a political debate. Again I am only trying to reiterate how important it is to not only encourage your young ladies. But to guide them toward fields where they can be financially stable.

We have all at one time or another use the Wage gap as a political tool. But other than a few select instances where employers try to pay us less, it is by and large a gap created by the careers we choose.

Now please do not get me wrong. I don't want anyone here to think I am shaming them because they decided to go into a field that typically receives less compensation. All I am saying is that we need to let our girls know that there is nothing wrong with deciding to become an engineer a framer a welder or any of the other careers that are typically dominated by men.

Again. I am not trying to take anything away from the women that choose to enter the workforce in positions that are typically dominated by women. Many of these careers are essential to our way of life. And are very demanding. But many of these fields receive less compensation not because they require less skill or less dedication. But because they are fields that offer services instead of producing a product.

Nor am I trying to take away from our wonderful stay at home moms. I hope you all understand this.

This is simply about offering our young women the opportunity to make informed decisions so they can decide what kind of life they want to lead.

I can not count the number of times that I've had people look at me sideways when I tell them I'm a millwright that previously was a rig welder out east. It's disheartening when someone says something to the effect of "you're too pretty for that work." Even if it's meant as a compliment.

Let them know that it's ok to wait to start a family. And it's equally ok to decide to take time off work to start a family. But make sure they know that each and every decision they make has consequences.

Thank you for reading.
 

baymule

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I absolutely 100% agree with you. I was a machine operator when I was younger and I enjoyed it. It was hard work, but it sure paid good.

And don't forget the financial aspect of not only making good money, but taking care of it and being responsible. I opened a checking account for my daughter when she was 7 years old. Her child support check went into her account and she had to pay her "bills." She had to pay her babysitter, school supplies, shoes, clothes and so on. After she paid her "bills" she could buy a toy. At 18, my husband cosigned a bank loan for her for $1000 and we instructed her to walk inside the bank to pay the note. She paid it off early and made another loan. She started college at 16 and had her Bachelor's at 19. By age 23 she had 2 Master's degrees and is now a college professor.

Girl Power!
 

CJ1

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Very very true. And good on your baby girl.
 

Britesea

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I have a friend who encouraged her two daughters to pursue engineering degrees in college. It had nothing to do with what they wanted to do with their lives, but it has been shown that graduates with engineering degrees almost universally command higher pay in any field- not just engineering.
 
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cyrhere

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Great topic, cj!

I'm a lady structural engineer by profession... I chose this field cause, first, I enjoyed math (not a geek. Numbers just make sense to me) and second, I wanted to choose a field where I can come up with something grand and tangible. Engineering being dominated by men never bothered me. In fact you'd be amazed at how many women engineers we have in the office! We even have this once a year weeklong activity for GROW (growing represenation and opportunity for women) aimed at empowering women in the workforce.

I love my career. Next to my kids, its the reason I jump out of bed each morning.. at times, its also what keeps me up at night! Not an easy job, but for me, its very rewarding.
 
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