Food forest.....

Phaedra

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I also dreamed of a food forest a few years ago when we bought the house and finally had our own garden.

But I changed my mind. Self-sufficiency is meaningful, no doubt. However, when the food forest produces tons of food, it might not always be joyful for everyone. Harvesting seasonal and fresh strawberries is a blessing; making some strawberry jam is also lovely. But, the situation might be different when there are 20kg, 30kg, 40kg, or more strawberries.

Ultimately, it has to match what my family and I really need instead of what it looks like in others' lives. I was also once very keen to have our bee hives, but I gave it up because we might consume less than three or four bottles of honey per year. I decided to support the local farm that produces honey.

Like a food forest - I enjoy watching EdibleAcres very much, but I won't even consider doing similar settings in our garden. A food forest, under the common definition, might include elements I don't enjoy - varieties (of crops), maintenance, harvest, preservation, and etc.

That's why I took it more as a reference now. Gardening also needs balance, and it's lifelong learning for me.
 

baymule

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While most of us won’t plant a whole property in a food forest, we can plant fruit and nut trees of what we like. Some berry vines and we’ll be set. We were able to pick pears off a couple of trees 2 years ago and I still have pears in pint jars.

Because fruit trees provide so much, I’m thinking of planting them in a pasture, with a protective fence around rack tree, so the sheep don’t eat the trees. As the trees grow and produce, I can make the fence smaller to protect the tree trunk, and let the sheep eat the fallen fruit. Berries and grapes will be planted in the yard or garden area. Sorry sheep, no access for you!
 

tortoise

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While most of us won’t plant a whole property in a food forest, we can plant fruit and nut trees of what we like. Some berry vines and we’ll be set. We were able to pick pears off a couple of trees 2 years ago and I still have pears in pint jars.

Because fruit trees provide so much, I’m thinking of planting them in a pasture, with a protective fence around rack tree, so the sheep don’t eat the trees. As the trees grow and produce, I can make the fence smaller to protect the tree trunk, and let the sheep eat the fallen fruit. Berries and grapes will be planted in the yard or garden area. Sorry sheep, no access for you!
My sheep do a nice job cleaning up fallen apples. They don't prune my trees too often either. (Trunks are safe from them, but little low branches might disappear). I have fence around younger trees like you mentioned.

I feed a lot of apples to chickens. And DH feeds everything else to the deer. If you (or your neighbors) have animals to feed, excess produce is less of a concern.
 

baymule

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