General Planning for the Upcoming Season

flowerbug

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what are you aiming for this coming season in terms of Self Sufficiency improvements?

around here i have projects for dealing with some erosion that i'll be looking at, mostly water works i guess is what this would fall under. :)

the rest of the plans are to improve and expand pea plantings as i do like them in so many ways.
 

SprigOfTheLivingDead

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Less varieties but more of what I choose. Corn, jalapenos, cucumbers (two types), tomatoes (two types) & one bell pepper. Also planting strawberries to provide me with bounties of yum yums.

Aside from that I'm trying to lock myself down to a rear tine tiller to buy for tilling up some garden sections and then also using it to flatten out some trail spots and till up thistle areas as they sprout.

I would love to build another raised bed or two this summer to then fill in in the fall.

And then on top of that expanding my tree farm by 75 trees (pot in pot system, so auger the holes, clean them out, put the pots in the ground and lay out irrigation) and selling and replacing about 100 trees.

I think that's it. Oh! planting some new fruit trees!! peaches and pears
 

Hinotori

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As soon as the ground can be tilled, I'll be planting peas. We're going to use the 20x60 area that I moved the silkie pens from a year and a half ago. I have some cattle panels that will turned into trellises with the aid of some 2x4s.

I've also been filling the silkie courtyard with raised beds and putting my berries there.
 

flowerbug

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Less varieties but more of what I choose. Corn, jalapenos, cucumbers (two types), tomatoes (two types) & one bell pepper. Also planting strawberries to provide me with bounties of yum yums.

Aside from that I'm trying to lock myself down to a rear tine tiller to buy for tilling up some garden sections and then also using it to flatten out some trail spots and till up thistle areas as they sprout.

I would love to build another raised bed or two this summer to then fill in in the fall.

And then on top of that expanding my tree farm by 75 trees (pot in pot system, so auger the holes, clean them out, put the pots in the ground and lay out irrigation) and selling and replacing about 100 trees.

I think that's it. Oh! planting some new fruit trees!! peaches and pears

can you grow Montmorency Tart Cherries there? those are so good when dried.
 

wyoDreamer

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@SprigOfTheLivingDead Do you have a tractor to run a rear tine tiller, or are you looking for a walk behind? We bought a King Cutter tiller for my LS tractor and love it! It has enough power to rip through the pasture sod and with a little disking we have cleared areas for wildlife plantings.

We just ordered 2 Montmorency Tart Cherry trees to plant this spring. I had planted one about 3 years ago but my husband dropped a pine tree on it and broke the top off, then last summer he mowed the new growth down. Hopefully, I have better luck with these 2 trees.

I had planted a hedge row of Nanking Cherries at one of our previous houses, but while we were on vacation one week, our neighbor did a favor and mowed our lawn. He was so proud to be able to mow down the "weeds" along the camper without hitting the camper I just didn't have the heart to tell him that it was a hedge of cherries. There were cherries spread across the yard to 20 feet out, lol.
 

flowerbug

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@SprigOfTheLivingDead Do you have a tractor to run a rear tine tiller, or are you looking for a walk behind? We bought a King Cutter tiller for my LS tractor and love it! It has enough power to rip through the pasture sod and with a little disking we have cleared areas for wildlife plantings.

We just ordered 2 Montmorency Tart Cherry trees to plant this spring. I had planted one about 3 years ago but my husband dropped a pine tree on it and broke the top off, then last summer he mowed the new growth down. Hopefully, I have better luck with these 2 trees.

I had planted a hedge row of Nanking Cherries at one of our previous houses, but while we were on vacation one week, our neighbor did a favor and mowed our lawn. He was so proud to be able to mow down the "weeds" along the camper without hitting the camper I just didn't have the heart to tell him that it was a hedge of cherries. There were cherries spread across the yard to 20 feet out, lol.

yeah, i've had neighbors remove an entire hedge of golden raspberry plants thinking they were thorn bushes. they were good eating while they lasted.

this coming season put a metal stake with a flag near the plants so it is always visible and talk to anyone who might be doing any yardwork to make sure they don't ruin your efforts and $.
 

SprigOfTheLivingDead

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can you grow Montmorency Tart Cherries there? those are so good when dried.
We can! But I already spent too much cash I did not have on trees for this year, so can't do anymore :/

@SprigOfTheLivingDead Do you have a tractor to run a rear tine tiller, or are you looking for a walk behind? We bought a King Cutter tiller for my LS tractor and love it! It has enough power to rip through the pasture sod and with a little disking we have cleared areas for wildlife plantings.

We just ordered 2 Montmorency Tart Cherry trees to plant this spring. I had planted one about 3 years ago but my husband dropped a pine tree on it and broke the top off, then last summer he mowed the new growth down. Hopefully, I have better luck with these 2 trees.

I had planted a hedge row of Nanking Cherries at one of our previous houses, but while we were on vacation one week, our neighbor did a favor and mowed our lawn. He was so proud to be able to mow down the "weeds" along the camper without hitting the camper I just didn't have the heart to tell him that it was a hedge of cherries. There were cherries spread across the yard to 20 feet out, lol.

No tractor, just looking for a walk-behind right now. I did note that DR and others have some good tow behind ones for ATVs, but out of the area that I want to spend for this spring. Like I think I said in the other thread I wish I had another $1k :)
 

baymule

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Last year I vowed to work my garden hard and put up all I could, sell some and give away some. With Covid and food shortages, that's what I did. This year I will do much the same. I'll be planting a bigger Painted Mountain corn patch, for cornmeal. I finally have enough seed to plant a big patch.

My left knee is knobby with arthritus and has given me a lot of pain. It cuts into my lifestyle. This is the year that I address that problem and will include knee replacement if that is what it takes. So I will be winding everything down in August to reduce the chores so my husband can take up my slack while I am recovering from surgery. My goals are a huge burst of energy to get the garden in and harvested, raise 2 batches of Cornish Cross meat chickens of 50 each, get them processed, sold and distributed to family and friends, raise 3 hogs this year, 1 for us, a half for our DD and family and 1 1/2 for a customer. Lambing this year has taken place during the worst winter Texas has had in 100 years. I'll have to think on that, can't lamb in the fall while I'm down, so may have to repeat lambing in January-February, giving me a chance to recover and do therapy. Husband would be totally lost with a rejected newborn lamb.

I have a lot to do in preparation for doing something that has plagued me for years. It is difficult to live my life dragging around a knee that doesn't work right. It's my turn.
 

farmerjan

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@baymule I am with you on that....I am planning my knee replacements for late Oct due to needing to be able to help with haying season this year. I am hurting too..... and hoping that I can do what I want to do this year. New house, needing alot of work yet to be done, new garden area.... I will be getting chickens as it happens, when there are left behinds, and a steer to go in my freezer in a month. Finish getting the rest of my stuff moved in the next month.
Then some serious yard clean up.....boxwoods and scrub trees all cleaned up.
New Wood burning furnace for the house since with the cost of a new oil furnace ...then the added cost of fuel oil that looks to be going through the roof.....so will make use of the wood we get cleaning up fence rows and such.

Getting moved into this house and cutting my monthly payments is the first step, more food put back for less reliance on the grocery store. Getting the knees fixed so that I will be more productive AND in alot less pain the following year. The ankle has done so good, that I want the knees done now. But cannot do it now and leave DS in the lurch for hay season. I can manage on the tractor with tedding and raking so will wait for late fall. Dr cannot do them before first of May, and we usually are cutting first fields the first of May.
Having things put by and put back to be as self sufficient as I can be next year; within my abilities until the knees get replaced. Then to get things better for the next year.
 
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