Growing my own meat

Denim Deb

More Precious than Rubies
Joined
Oct 21, 2010
Messages
14,987
Reaction score
587
Points
407
Does size matter for taxes?
 

frustratedearthmother

Sustainability Master
Joined
Mar 11, 2012
Messages
15,364
Reaction score
7,742
Points
423
Location
USDA 9a
What a bout a mini-pig? They would still take care of any windfall fruit and might not be so hard to contain...? Just a thought on my part because I've only had the big pigs, even though I never had any trouble containing them. Goats aren't so much for tearing up fences - but they are opportunistic escapees. If there is a hole, they will find it, go through it, and probably forget where the hole is when they want to come home, lol. All in all, I think geese would work well for you.

What is considered a "building" in Denmark? Does a building have to have a concrete floor, or posts in the ground, or built out of wood or metal? Just wondering because at one time I had some 8 foot sections of pre-fab wooden fencing. They made a great A-frame shelter just leaned up against each other and stabilized with some metal t-posts. Not exactly a building, lol.

Good plan for you to be thinking ahead. Hope you get it all worked out. :)
 

Steffenkbh

Sustainable Newbie
Joined
Oct 31, 2014
Messages
9
Reaction score
1
Points
9
Anything that is atached to the ground and can not be moved around is a building.
Sections of pre-fab plywooden leaning against something, haybales arranged in a U, chicken hoobs, all those things are,,,,, not exactly a building, lol.

I am getting the feeling in america you don't needed to consider what is a boilding. Maby you pay a lot less taxes for owning buildings (compared to us) and that is why my unwillingness to own more buildings than abselutly nessesary is alien to you. It is simply a choice betwene land or buildings, at least until I win the Lotto, and I would rather buy an extra hectare (2,4 acres) of land or forest than use that money on taxes for a building that is not 100% needed.

Thanks for the good input so far, allso there are a lot to harvest from around this forum and sister sites. So far I am leaning towards chickens or geese as the first animals, but I have not been scared of by those pigs or goats. Probably one of the two will fallow if I can manage it.
 

Hinotori

Super Self-Sufficient
Joined
Nov 2, 2011
Messages
2,552
Reaction score
1,928
Points
293
Location
Washington
Outbuildings aren't taxed very heavily here. They go by the value of the structure. Many require you buy a permit to build.

Where I am we can build one unpermitted structure that is 200 square feet or smaller as long as it doesn't have utilities to it. Need a permit to run power and water lines. The well house doesn't count as a structure because it's housing for a utility as long as it is just large enough to house and work with the pump, pressure tank, and other things we may have on the water like filters.
 

Denim Deb

More Precious than Rubies
Joined
Oct 21, 2010
Messages
14,987
Reaction score
587
Points
407
Around here, we need a permit for anything over 100 sq feet, and have to pay taxes on any thing that's a permanent structure. It's consider permanent if it has a solid floor. I'll have to take some pics of my hay shelter. It is not a permanent structure, so there's no taxes on it, nor did I need a permit.
 

Smart Red

Lovin' The Homestead
Joined
Jan 10, 2012
Messages
119
Reaction score
28
Points
93
Location
Wisconsin
I like your thinking, @baymule. Hoop housing is an excellent temporary way to provide shelter as well as a longer growing season if @Steffenkbh hopes for veggies to go along with his meat.
 

Steffenkbh

Sustainable Newbie
Joined
Oct 31, 2014
Messages
9
Reaction score
1
Points
9
I am back, no closer to owning my own land, but a little wiser regarding how to start.

The amount of easy to find 1st hand experience, combined with relative low start up price, made me settle on chickens. And I can make their home myself.
A moveable chicken-house whith a (detachable) netted yard in front, will work very well I think. Intensive scraping and droppings on a small piece of soil for later working and planting, or as a nightly safehaven if I let the chickens run free. Choosing a type that can/will not fly, will also make it more easy to fence in them or vulnerble crop areas, whatever is more practicle.
My perfect dream is to let them run free from morning to evening, then having them come back to their house and close it for the night.

If people in the city can have 2 healthy chickens in their garden, I can too have healthy chickens. At my future hobby farm ofc, not in my current apartment ;-)


Q: When you say Hoop house, is that the 'yard' or house+yard combined? I guess the hoop is what I call yard, from hola hoop rings cut in two covered with net, and a hoop house are the hole pakage.
 

Latest posts

Top