Help my kids study the weather!

mrghostwalker

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Several years ago my youngest did a science project in which he recorded (printed out) the 10 day weather forecast and compared the long range prediction of precipitation with the actual weather for that day.
He found that long range forecast for rain was never very accurate.
This is a good way to have your children follow predictions of weather for more than a week while making their own observations. My son enjoyed watching to see what the real weather was going to be. He kept charts of his own observations.
 

Lazy Gardener

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Meteorologist: What other job can you have, where you can be wrong more than 50% of the time, where it doesn't matter whether you are right or wrong... and you still get to keep your job????
 

Hinotori

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We just assume that if you give it 10 minutes it will rain here.

Summer here is mostly dry and runs from July 4 to Labor Day.


Woolly bear caterpillars are supposed to predict how harsh winter will be. More black (narrow orange) means nastier winter. Wide orange middle band is mild winter. I just wish they would stay out of my utility room.
 

flowerbug

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I forgot about joints aching meaning that storms are coming.

Bad joints do react to rapid changes in barometric pressure. That is usually a sign of a storm coming in.
yeah, i sometimes notice changes in the weather coming but changes in sinus pressure and sometimes even sinus headaches.
 

BarredBuff

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Here are some I have always heard/believed:

**Hornets nesting high in a tree means there will be a lot of snow that winter.
**Thick corn husks/silks, and onion husks mean a cold winter is coming.
**Woolly worms. The ratio of brown to black is the ratio of mild to severe cold in the winter.
**When the frost flowers bloom, you are six weeks from a frost.
**Thunder in February, frost in May.
**Fogs in August correspond to snows in the winter.

The Farmer's Almanac has plenty of these sayings in them. I would encourage you all to look for local signs to that point to weather changes. Personally, here are a few I have noticed:

**When the sweet gum turns red, Fall is just ahead.
**The clouds, and clarity of the sky usually give a hint to the season you're in. Big clouds, clear blue sky in the early Fall. Wispy clouds, and light blue sky in the spring.
**Iron weed blooming is always a good pointer to fall.
**Chickens nesting in the spring and fall.

I am also a public school teacher that deals in natural sciences too. Some projects you could do:

**Buy a rain gauge, and record the amount of precipitation in a set time period. Compare the next year. Or total for the year, and plot the data on a graph.

**Record the temperature throughout the day by the hour, and calculate the average temperature for the day. Or record the temperature throughout the week at a certain time, and calculate the average temperature.

**Record the temperature for a specific day each month, and average it for the year.

**Buy a hygrometer, and record the impacts on vegetable plants with a photo.

I literally could go all day with ideas! Hope this helps
 
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