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How much do you practice?

Discussion in 'Emergency Preparedness' started by DianeS, Dec 26, 2012.

  1. Dec 27, 2012
    Hinotori

    Hinotori Super Self-Sufficient

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    Use a small piece of fine a toothed saw to scrape the magnesium off. We have a burned out reciprocating blade on a string with with ours. Duct tape wrapped around the end to make a little handle. I've been on on the look out for one of those little mini hand spice graters, which I think would work better. I've seen them with a magnet on them as a fridge decoration.
     
  2. Dec 28, 2012
    ~gd

    ~gd Lovin' The Homestead

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    Well I have a nice modern Nuck power plant just 20 miles from here but some how they manage to let the lights go out at least once a month [they blame it on the pine trees] so I have all that unscheduled practice.
    btw For that oil Lamp I use Fiberglass rather than cotton.[fiberglass might melt but not burn Then I loosely braid it with a ahort bit of wire [to hold up the wick out of the oil. I keep the already built lamps in small jelly jars, The clear glass lets the light out. I walk with a cane and my sister who is in a wheel chair sent me a small LED flashlight that clamps to the cane.
     
  3. Dec 28, 2012
    IW

    IW Enjoys Recycling

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    I live off the grid on solar power so the occasional "black out" does occur :lol: I have an oil lamp collection, mainly because I have always liked them but they come in real handy. Auctions are a good place to find them and even Walmart carries them and the oil.

    Good LED flash lights and stick on lights are a must around here both for indoor black outs and to go outdoors after dark. You could also pick up some emergency candles or make your own to keep on hand.
     
  4. Feb 21, 2013
    Blaundee

    Blaundee Power Conserver

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    Except for the fact that I LOVE convenience, running water, texting on my phone, and watching tv, I think we're readyi
     
  5. Apr 24, 2013
    MiracleWik

    MiracleWik Enjoys Recycling

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    I always use dryer lint. I roll it up tight, then pinch some areas loose. It catches easier than cotton and burns long enough to get kindling going, even with just sparks from a flint.

    -Ashley
     
  6. Apr 24, 2013
    ThrottleJockey

    ThrottleJockey Power Conserver

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    If you are stuck with no lint, use a pocket knife and scrape it back and forth on your pants leg. This will provide enough to get a fire going!
     
  7. Aug 3, 2013
    robinhoodie

    robinhoodie Enjoys Recycling

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    Not enough :D I should have like a week every six months where I go off-grid, switch off my electricity and running water. Would be an interesting challenge. I do have a cabin that I go to for weekends though.
     
  8. Aug 4, 2013
    Britesea

    Britesea Sustainability Master

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    practicing ahead of time could save you a lot of grief, and maybe even save your life. Think of the people that buy a gun and one box of ammo, and stick it in their closet. They may not even know how to load the thing, but by G*d, they have their self-defense taken care of!

    I remember reading something on another site about aluminum foil. Most prepper sites recommend carrying a folded up piece of foil in your survival pack- for cooking in, or carrying water. Well, the guy on this site had discovered, by practicing, that aluminum foil ain't what it used to be. He said every brand he tried, no matter how 'heavy duty' it was, developed leaks at any folds. That could cause some grief at a crucial moment, eh?

    and the people that have their tins of beans and wheat and have no idea what to do with them (for instance, sprouting some of them to provide fresh veggies).

    Having off-the-grid days or even full weekends will really help you deal with that later-- like knowing the best places to put your lamps for maximum light. We have a natural gas stove, so we have experimented with having gas but no electricity, and the placing of lamps can make a huge difference in cooking (I've informed my husband that a headlamp is on my wishlist now)
     
  9. Aug 4, 2013
    moolie

    moolie Almost Self-Reliant

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    We have most of our "survival skills" down pretty pat due to our annual camping and backpacking trips, we hit the alpine pretty regularly once the spring snow has mostly melted away. Longest trips I've done have been about a week, but once you are out there really the only limiting factor is food.

    The only concern we'd have if we lost utilities is that we don't have an alternate source of heat during the winter months except for a wood burning fireplace that is more decorative than useful. We are close to water that is easily made potable by boiling or filtering with our backpacking filter, we are pretty well stocked with food year-round and have several ways to cook it, and we have our lighting and heating (in milder weather) pretty taken care of.

    If anyone is interested in practicing "surprise" emergency drills, the website www.foodstoragemadeeasy.net runs a week of prep drills called the "7 Day Challenge" every September--I started a thread about it last year http://www.sufficientself.com/forum/viewtopic.php?id=13006
     

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