i got worms

flowerbug

Almost Self-Reliant
Joined
Oct 24, 2019
Messages
717
Reaction score
597
Points
137
Location
mid-Michigan, USoA
that is, i keep worms. :)

in a house that cannot have any furry creatures or fish tanks or room for much else i've now got 12 buckets of worms perking along getting ready for next spring when i plant.

unlike many people who worm compost i use a mix of dirt from the gardens and also organic materials up top. which also means i use a mix of worm species.

i've been doing this since May 2010 and it has taught me a lot of things and i keep messing around too to learn more.

the additions this past season to the mix were some tiny spiders and a mole cricket (by accident) which serenaded me most of the summer and into the early fall until i either killed it or it dug down so deep to hibernate that it's not come back up for air yet. i think it may be the former.

i don't have any recent pictures yet, but older pictures and explanations of what i am doing are on the website pages at:

 

HunnyBunny

Sustainable Newbie
Joined
Dec 11, 2019
Messages
6
Reaction score
2
Points
5
wow wow worms!

when I was a kid, my Mom told me not to handle these worms as they might enter me through my fingers or anywhere.
Luckily, it did not happen.

Now that I like gardening and when i repot, I see these worms and let them be.

You are brave!
Thanks for sharing! :thumbsup
 

flowerbug

Almost Self-Reliant
Joined
Oct 24, 2019
Messages
717
Reaction score
597
Points
137
Location
mid-Michigan, USoA
wow wow worms!

when I was a kid, my Mom told me not to handle these worms as they might enter me through my fingers or anywhere.
Luckily, it did not happen.

Now that I like gardening and when i repot, I see these worms and let them be.

You are brave!
Thanks for sharing! :thumbsup
they are simple creatures but provide so much and almost every animal likes to eat them if given the chance. the difference in populations between what exists outside and what is in the worm buckets after a year is amazing. they have no competition inside here. i can go from 500-1000 worms to 10,000 - 20,000 worms in a year's time. they won't hurt you, there's no bravery involved for sure...
 

Lazy Gardener

Super Self-Sufficient
Joined
May 14, 2017
Messages
2,751
Reaction score
2,544
Points
232
Location
Central Maine, Zone 4B
@HunnyBunny ... Your mother was well meaning, but confused. Earth worms can not parasitize you, or any other animal. They can be an intermediate host for some parasitic worms, but... you are not going to get infected by handling earth worms!

Most parasites must pass through a "vector" where they compete part of their life cycle, before they can reach a stage that is capable of infecting a person or other animal. Many insects, mice, snails, crustaceans, fish, animals, as well as a plethora of other life forms act as intermediate hosts. You can even pick up shed parasite oocysts by handling fruits or veggies at the grocer! The most important way to prevent infection: wash your hands!

So, go ahead, enjoy the earth worms that you encounter. I just wouldn't be putting them in my mouth!
 

HunnyBunny

Sustainable Newbie
Joined
Dec 11, 2019
Messages
6
Reaction score
2
Points
5
they are simple creatures but provide so much and almost every animal likes to eat them if given the chance. the difference in populations between what exists outside and what is in the worm buckets after a year is amazing. they have no competition inside here. i can go from 500-1000 worms to 10,000 - 20,000 worms in a year's time. they won't hurt you, there's no bravery involved for sure...
Now I know.. Thanks for the info Flowerbug! :thumbsup
 

HunnyBunny

Sustainable Newbie
Joined
Dec 11, 2019
Messages
6
Reaction score
2
Points
5
@HunnyBunny ... Your mother was well meaning, but confused. Earth worms can not parasitize you, or any other animal. They can be an intermediate host for some parasitic worms, but... you are not going to get infected by handling earth worms!

Most parasites must pass through a "vector" where they compete part of their life cycle, before they can reach a stage that is capable of infecting a person or other animal. Many insects, mice, snails, crustaceans, fish, animals, as well as a plethora of other life forms act as intermediate hosts. You can even pick up shed parasite oocysts by handling fruits or veggies at the grocer! The most important way to prevent infection: wash your hands!

So, go ahead, enjoy the earth worms that you encounter. I just wouldn't be putting them in my mouth!
Yes I know Lazy Gardener. I was a kid then who likes exploring the world. Thanks for the infos! :thumbsup
 

flowerbug

Almost Self-Reliant
Joined
Oct 24, 2019
Messages
717
Reaction score
597
Points
137
Location
mid-Michigan, USoA
I was gonna say eat some garlic but... I grew and sold night crawlers when I was a youngun.
it is rather interesting when harvesting onions or garlic to see how many worms would be lurking around those roots. i also notice that when i compost bits of garlic, the peels and any dried up roots that the worms seem to really like that sort of material. i think they like the sulfur compounds as much as we do. :)

i'm pretty sure in general that most plants give off some really good numnums for the soil creatures to enjoy, why not the worms too? :)
 

YourRabbitGirl

Lovin' The Homestead
Joined
Dec 30, 2019
Messages
211
Reaction score
78
Points
60
that is, i keep worms. :)

in a house that cannot have any furry creatures or fish tanks or room for much else i've now got 12 buckets of worms perking along getting ready for next spring when i plant.

unlike many people who worm compost i use a mix of dirt from the gardens and also organic materials up top. which also means i use a mix of worm species.

i've been doing this since May 2010 and it has taught me a lot of things and i keep messing around too to learn more.

the additions this past season to the mix were some tiny spiders and a mole cricket (by accident) which serenaded me most of the summer and into the early fall until i either killed it or it dug down so deep to hibernate that it's not come back up for air yet. i think it may be the former.

i don't have any recent pictures yet, but older pictures and explanations of what i am doing are on the website pages at:

That is very interestingly disgusting... but i know how important worms are for planting.. keep it up.. not a lot of people know how to handle those little critters.
 

Lazy Gardener

Super Self-Sufficient
Joined
May 14, 2017
Messages
2,751
Reaction score
2,544
Points
232
Location
Central Maine, Zone 4B
thanks for quoting that post. I missed it the first time around. I'm gonna post that article over on my HK thread for future reference.
 
Top