I've got my eye on something, what do you think?

donrae

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http://medford.craigslist.org/grd/3235046471.html

Here's the text if the link isn't good......



Adorable approximately 6 year old dexter cow and 9 month old dexter/zebu (Zedex) cross hieffer. Just saw the vet for vaccines (including Bangs), worming, dehorned heiffer. Out on good pasture - perfect homesteaders dairy/meat family project or other - because perfect amount of milk/meat for a typical family. We just bought recently for a family project and must sell due to unexpected travelling. Must sell NOW! -$900 make us an offer - could take partial trade. Rosie is still in milk - adorable LiIly has been debudded - both healthy. or email thanks!

I've been wanting a milk cow forever but just didn't think I could. Well, why the heck not? If not now, when? I have enough room for one, and a friend has been looking for something to put on their acre+ pasture to keep it down. The price seems great from other ads I've seen. I'm not too familiar with the Zebu, but looking them up they look good. I'm thinking, could just grow out the calf and eat her, breed the cow to a Dexter or maybe a mini Jersey.

Anyone have experience with this cross, Dexter/Zebu? Would it be worth keeping the calf as the milk cow and butchering the cow? Any idea how long Dexters are productive?

I've sent an e-mail, waiting to hear back more about the cow. So excited! :D
 

mississippifarmboy

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I couldn't see her udder in any of the pictures, but I know lots of people do milk dexters. I've never raised them myself. Zebu I have had. They are a good small cow, but not as "beefy" as some other breeds. Just think miniature Brahma. I know people who milk them too. If you have a small family it sounds like a good deal depending on how they look in person.
 

pinkfox

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dexter milk is LOVELY...not as much in terms of volume as a holstein or jersey but just as rich as a jersey (high buttermilk content) dexter are a ual breed so also make good meaties.
the zebu is a good dual purpose too, being minis your not going to get as much meat, but they are still often use as a beef breed, and a mini should be proportinate and combined with the meat from the dexter (dexter meat is to die for!) you should get a good meat product...
the milk from the zebu tends to be "thinner" but plentiful, socombined with the dexter lines it should give you a lovely rich milk with good quantity for a mini...
zebu are also frequently used as a draft breed, obviously mini = smaller load, but could definatly harness train


Dexters are my breed of choice when i finally get the property in some grass...theres nothing tasiter than dexter beef, and the milk is loverly, they are also VERY good mothers and typically very sweet tempered (even the bulls are typically sweet and maangable...)
im hoping for a trio of dexter myself, a bull, 2 cows and ilbe keeping a steer each year for the freezer.

zebu are a "novelty" breed but the brahma they are bred down from are hard working breed bred tobe all purpose and easily managed.
ive met a lot of zebu mixes used in kiddy rodeo too.
 

Mickey328

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Personally, I'd go for it! When we finally get the space, we plan on a mini...probably a Dexter. We don't need tons of milk, and from the research I've done, the quality is excellent. We would also breed to freshen then raise the calf to decent size and butcher for meat. Best of all worlds, IMO.
 

donrae

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Well here's what we heard back on e-mail......

Hello - we can tell you only a little - we did talk to a previous owner and Rosie (momma) was purely used for breeding, without much handling - he was just using steers for meat and selling off heiffers. She calved easily and dependably every year. We got them from the next owner who is a local business owner and she only had them for 4 weeks and needed to sell them as her pasture she had planned to keep them at fell through. So then WE bought them as we wanted them to be a great project for us as a family. While the previous woman had them over the 4 weeks, she worked with them often and got the mother really tame. We too found the same thing, and just by working with her, have been able to run our hands down her sides, touching her udders etc - our 14 year old son also was able to squirt milk several times - he is definitely a novice when it comes to milking and she was unbelievable patient. We have a rancher friend, who felt that with a stanchion, she would come to be a good milker - obviously the younger heiffer should be an easier bet, due to age. Everything we've read about Dexters has said they have great calm temperament and are very docile. This appears to be true. We paid over $1,000 for them and then spent $400 on the vet bill for vaccinations/check up/debudding etc - we are hoping we can find a good home for them - they really are adorable and have a lot of potential. Lilly has not been halter broke - we have her out on about 1 acre and she stays on momma's other side - I've pet her several times, only when she didn't really realize what I was doing. We've priced them well below what they are worth so that hopefully they sell quickly and go to a good home. Let us know if you'd like to come by and see them anytime.


I do wish they'd been handled more, but then again they're miniatures, right? I've been a horse person all my life so I'm not intimidated by size. I guess we can see what a stanchion and some grain do, huh?

I've still got to talk to my honey but I think we'll try to go see them Friday. Since it's quite a drive to get there, we'll probably just hook the trailer up.........ya know, just in case..........I'm so excited!!!!!
 

Denim Deb

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I've never yet known someone to hook up a trailer and bring it home empty-even if it's not what they'd planned on getting! :lol:
 

Mickey328

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Sounds like it won't really take much in the way of handling to get them accustomed to it. If you've had lots of experience with horses I'll bet you could do it very quickly..prolly all that's needed is a little patience and, as you said, a nice bucket of grain :) Do let us know how it goes...I'll be really interested!
 

frustratedearthmother

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Wait - where are these critters? Wonder how long it would take for me to get there with my trailer?! :hide
 

donrae

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Thanks for the good thoughts. Honey's a little leary of the fact they've been resold quickly twice now...........I think it's just circumstances but he thinks there's something wrong with the animals. I guess we'll see.

Deb......when I was buying and selling horses a lot I loved to see someone pull up to "look over" a horse with the trailer already hooked up! It always meant dollar signs to me. Hopefully these folks don't think the same way?
 

~gd

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I would try to stash the trailer until the deal is done, they are more likely to deal and accept a check without it. often you can stash a trailer at a gas station though you might have to pay a fee. don't just leave it by the road unless you can lock it so it can't be taken, removing a wheel won't stop them been there, lost trailer.
 
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