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Messybun

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Give me a book and you’ve given me the world -unknown

What are your favorite homesteading or self sufficiency books?
 

FarmerJamie

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We have the entire Foxfire series, multiple canning books, and my favorite (great memories of my grandparents), Jerry Baker's Great Green book of Gardening secrets.

The last is not really what I would call self-sufficient, but lots of low cost remedies
 

Messybun

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We have the entire Foxfire series, multiple canning books, and my favorite (great memories of my grandparents), Jerry Baker's Great Green book of Gardening secrets.

The last is not really what I would call self-sufficient, but lots of low cost remedies
I absolutely consider thrifting and old fashioned remedies self-sufficiency! Thank you
 

tortoise

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I keep a soapmaking book with tables so you can make your own recipes. I hope I never need it.

2 foraging/identification books specific to my region.

Current Ball canning cookbook.

A butchering book.

A book on homemade garden amendments. Interesting but not sure its good enough to share the title. I might like it better after I try it.

There is a book on small scale grain growing I want.
 

Alaskan

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Give me a book and you’ve given me the world -unknown

What are your favorite homesteading or self sufficiency books?
I think it is vital to have excellent foraging books for your specific region. I have a berry book, and several mushroom books, and a general plant gathering book.

I also find the little book on animal tracks of my area important to have. I know that sounds silly... but if the world crumbles, tracking and understanding what tracks you are looking at... so you know if you want to eat it, or it wants to eat your chickens, is important.

Also, a few gardening books ... I think regional ones are best.

I have been reading this book:
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The info can also be used to build a house, and a root cellar, etc. Great ideas, and he has good clear explanations on how to make sure it doesn't all collapse on your head.

I highly recommend the book. And it is good wherever you might live... south or north.
 

Trying2keepitReal

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Right on in my pile on my desk, I have a variety of books but they all center are SS and
gardening:

This Organic Life: Confessions of a Suburban Homesteader

The Quarter-Acre Farm

The Self Sufficient Suburban Garden

The Dirty Life

Farm Journal's Freezing and Canning Cookbook

Growing Tomorrow
 

Mini Horses

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I have many self printed articles, old books from 2nd hand for real cheap. Some hone in on a specific -- organics, garden pests, foraging, etc. Reference useful. One book that covers a lot of useful info, much old time methods...The Ultimate Guide to Homesteading by Nicole Faires, 2011. Not sure when or where I got it but, things like making lye (ash&rainwater) and how to check strength with an egg...🤔...soap making. The old way, not buying at the store. Lamps, knitting, moving things without equipment, building tips, canning, livestock info, training them, fence, wood types and use, seed, gardens, etc. Incredibly encompassing for living off grid/without if needed. Touches on a lot!

We all come across little looks that help. Never gonna be one for all things. :lol:
 

tortoise

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I have many self printed articles, old books from 2nd hand for real cheap. Some hone in on a specific -- organics, garden pests, foraging, etc. Reference useful. One book that covers a lot of useful info, much old time methods...The Ultimate Guide to Homesteading by Nicole Faires, 2011. Not sure when or where I got it but, things like making lye (ash&rainwater) and how to check strength with an egg...🤔...soap making. The old way, not buying at the store. Lamps, knitting, moving things without equipment, building tips, canning, livestock info, training them, fence, wood types and use, seed, gardens, etc. Incredibly encompassing for living off grid/without if needed. Touches on a lot!

We all come across little looks that help. Never gonna be one for all things. :lol:
Can you share checking lye strength? I knew about rain + wood ash, but always wondered how to know if it was "good" or concentrated enough
 

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