Opportunity to move to a bigger homestead

farmerjan

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So, where are you on decisions? Curiosity killed the cat but satisfaction brought it back... Can you make a "dual" deal of sorts work with some things at one place and some at another? Sounds like if your dad wants to do a market garden that there might be more possibilities there for things like canning etc.... but maybe some animals too.... pigs are always good for fall garden cleanup and killing early in the spring before gardening time comes back around...
 

Swampduck

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So, where are you on decisions? Curiosity killed the cat but satisfaction brought it back... Can you make a "dual" deal of sorts work with some things at one place and some at another? Sounds like if your dad wants to do a market garden that there might be more possibilities there for things like canning etc.... but maybe some animals too.... pigs are always good for fall garden cleanup and killing early in the spring before gardening time comes back around...
I'm going to try and leverage the strengths of both locations for now. I do think I'll eventually relocate to my dad's place since he's putting me on the title but I'll still help my mom take care of the orchard since that and the herb garden are probably the only things that would stay there long-term if I moved. I have been looking into KuneKune pigs, as they're pretty good at grazing/foraging.
 

baymule

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Kune Kune have seen their fad hey-day. They take a year or more to get to slaughter size and are small and fatty. I recommend not getting breeding stock, but get feeder pigs to raise for the freezer and maybe one or two to sell. It’s a good way to get introduced to pigs without the commitment to breeding stock.
 

Hinotori

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Kune Kune have seen their fad hey-day. They take a year or more to get to slaughter size and are small and fatty. I recommend not getting breeding stock, but get feeder pigs to raise for the freezer and maybe one or two to sell. It’s a good way to get introduced to pigs without the commitment to breeding stock.

They are still popular around here because easier to process at home and most people who raise them here want the lard.
 

Swampduck

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Kune Kune have seen their fad hey-day. They take a year or more to get to slaughter size and are small and fatty. I recommend not getting breeding stock, but get feeder pigs to raise for the freezer and maybe one or two to sell. It’s a good way to get introduced to pigs without the commitment to breeding stock.
Thanks for the tips!
 

Swampduck

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I went with AGHs....still took a yr to grow out, a lard type but far less proportionately than KuneKune. Meat was excellent! They are grazers. Easy to handle. I didn't want a large pig. These fit my needs.
I have considered them but unfortunately there's nowhere near me that sells feeders.
 
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