Pasture Health

CrealCritter

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I would like your honest assessment of the health of my pasture for cattle. I haven't touched this pasture with a blade all year. It's the end of July, I see some tall broadleaf and even a blessed thistle that causes me to think of bush hogging.. But then I see nice grasses and think maybe I should just leave it alone. I have 5 cattle on a little more than 9 acres and this is good representation of what it all looks like. Zoom in have a look around and please share your thoughts (good or bad). pasture management is something new to me.
IMG_20220729_155604729.jpg


Thanks

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CrealCritter

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What are the tall plants?

Pasture looks good to me. You don’t want to let weeds move in. If the cattle can’t keep up, mow before the weeds set seed.

Thanks for the reply 👍

Tall plants? I really don't know what all of them are, some are sapling hardwood trees.

The cattle most definitely are not keeping up, they are belly deep in there. I think they got plenty enough to eat.

What you think, hog it? For cool season grasses to grow? If so, how high? 6 or 8 inches maybe?

Maybe I need to look for a couple more head to keep up with the moowing?

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Trying2keepitReal

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Maybe I need to look for a couple more head to keep up with the moowing?

Jesus is Lord and Christ 🙏❤️🇺🇸
More cattle, yes!

I can't give any advice as I am not educated in cattle pastures, but I do think it looks nice. I would, personally and again eith no knowledge, cut down some if they can't keep up
 

baymule

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It is more work, but the very best treatment is using hot wire, confine them to a small area and move daily. What they don’t eat, they will poop and pee on—natures best fertilizer. They will trample the grass down, which feeds the microbes in the soil.

In the days of Buffalo on the prairie, the vast herds were constantly on the move, eating grass, trampling down the grasses, leaving their fertilizer behind. This revitalized the prairies and fed the soil.

Greg Judy is a big proponent of Managed Intensive Grazing or MIG. Look up his videos.

Me-I’m not going to all that trouble. My sheep are scarcely heavy enough to tramples down a pasture and not enough in numbers. I’m planning on permanent rotational pastures. In the back of my mind, I’m thinking I can always “borrow” some of my neighbors cows and run them through the pastures once or twice a year. If I have to, I can always mow.
 

CrealCritter

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I think I've got enough pasture so, I'll look to add a few more feeder steer late fall/early winter. I would like to try Hereford but can get Brangus at great price.

Jesus is Lord and Christ 🙏❤️🇺🇸
 
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