Picture Of The Week (POW) Information & Submissions

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CrealCritter

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Lol I spent a GOOD part of last night reading up on this. I couldnt find any specific references to pin worms and berries specifically but it appears that pin worms are easy to get from many many surfaces. (They can live up to 2 or 3 weeks on hard surfaces. One article estimated 50% of Aamericans already have them but many people have no symptoms. Eeeeeww!) Most references to worms on fruit seem to indicate that their food is the fruit, and are not likely to survive the digestive process. Given the likelihood that is probably get pin worms anyway, I'll continue to eat my fresh fruits and veggies straight from the garden. Adding a little protein along the way once in a while probably won't hurt.
Considering what's in or on the fruit I buy from the grocery store, I'll take my chances.

That being said, several sites recommend brining berries in a very salty water, then rinsing well. Others say to soak in Apple cider vinegar, then rinse well.

@CrealCritter, we eat a LOT of fresh garlic here. Now I have one more good reason. One of the sites even listen berries (Apple cider vinegar, garlic and others) as a way to get RID of pin worms! :barnieThat's a rabbit hole that's very deep and winding! Who knows what the right answer is?
That was my take away also - eat fresh garlic every so often also.
 
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Lazy Gardener

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After @CrealCritter post re: pinworms and fresh bramble fruits, I also did an exhaustive search. I could find nothing written re: link between pinworms and raspberries/blackberries. Given the fact that pinworms are very easy to pick up, without doing an O & P check on the suspected fruit, I don't know how one could point to any one thing as the source.
 

Lazy Gardener

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Given the conditions in the fields/orchards where produce is harvested... with accompanying lack of sanitation... and the fact that ova can survive for up to 3 weeks, IMO it would be more probable to pick up ANY parasite from produce bought at your local grocer than in your own back yard.
 

sumi

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My week in pictures:

A shy visitor:
View attachment 11496

A future watermelon: View attachment 11500

A female Eastern Dobson Fly: View attachment 11502

Summer Sunflower:
View attachment 11503

Yum!
View attachment 11504

Enough to share:
View attachment 11505

Summer beauty:View attachment 11506

A baby watermelon:View attachment 11507

Noccalula Falls:
View attachment 11509

A Wisconsin dawn:
View attachment 11508
Congrats @milkmansdaughter for getting this week's POW!
 

sumi

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My week in pictures:

A shy visitor:
View attachment 11496

A future watermelon: View attachment 11500

A female Eastern Dobson Fly: View attachment 11502

Summer Sunflower:
View attachment 11503

Yum!
View attachment 11504

Enough to share:
View attachment 11505

Summer beauty:View attachment 11506

A baby watermelon:View attachment 11507

Noccalula Falls:
View attachment 11509

A Wisconsin dawn:
View attachment 11508
Congrats @milkmansdaughter for getting this week's POW!
 

Mini Horses

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Feeding animals garlic helps them, too. Same reasons. Yep our feathered and furry friends "share" with us. :lol: The garlic in their systems helps lessen flea infestations, too. Guess fleas don't enjoy Italian :D
 
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