Planting Corn

Britesea

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I have a wide row I was thinking of planting to the Painted Mountain corn. It is approximately 24 feet long and 3-4 feet wide, oriented so the prevailing winds would blow through the long side, rather than across it. I was thinking of planting them a foot apart in every direction. Does this sound like a recipe for success, or failure? The only other time I ever tried to grow corn, I had my wide row oriented the other way, and I got very spotty fertilization.
 

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Planting at 1' increments would be the best option. If you could get a total of 4' available, that would be better. But, you gotta work with what you got to work with. One thing you can do is when the corn is in good silk, go out and shake the stalks a bit, concentrating on the outside rows. Tedious task, given the amount of plants involved... but... you COULD do that!
 

Britesea

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I can't plant for a couple more weeks either, but I'm getting the beds ready. I was thinking of doing a 3 Sisters type garden, but decided I don't really have the right space for it. So instead I'm doing the wide rows of each Sister.

This is also the first year I'm planting lots of flowers for extra pollination help. I've got some Chickling Vetch growing near the beets- the beets won't mind the partial shade and they should benefit from the great nitrogen fix from the vetch. I've also got sweet peas and poppies started. Hoping to get some Bee balm and Bee's Friend going too.
 

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You can get a jump on the corn season by pre-sprouting your seeds. The goal is to get them in the ground just as soon as the cotyledon and root tip become visible. THEN, cover the rows with plastic if you have it available.
 

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Usually, I'll soak in water for a few hours, then put in damp paper towels in a zip lock. If I'm sprouting enough for a whole planting, I will soak it then put it in one of my sprouting trays. These are for making salad sprouts. They keep the seeds moist, but not waterlogged, so there is less chance of mold or rot.
 

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I can't plant for a couple more weeks either, but I'm getting the beds ready. I was thinking of doing a 3 Sisters type garden, but decided I don't really have the right space for it. So instead I'm doing the wide rows of each Sister.

This is also the first year I'm planting lots of flowers for extra pollination help. I've got some Chickling Vetch growing near the beets- the beets won't mind the partial shade and they should benefit from the great nitrogen fix from the vetch. I've also got sweet peas and poppies started. Hoping to get some Bee balm and Bee's Friend going too.
I love flowers in the veggie garden. My favorites: Nasturtium, calendula, marigold, zinnia. All are super easy, and can be started from seed if you don't want to take the time to start them indoors.
 
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