Rancid Lard?

Emerald

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Britesea said:
Thanks ~gd, that was very helpful. Now if I could just figure out a way to get rid of the triglycerides in the commercial lard I bought before I found out it was hydrogenated.... I guess I'll just use this stuff to make soap :p
Rancid lard is good on my shovels and hand trowels and other garden stuff. sounds gross but keeps the metal from rusting over the winter in the shed.
I do not think I would use it to season any caste iron. I had to burn(low coals) my big fry pan as it spent the winter in the camper and just became too rank to use. haven't had that happen in a long time.
I wonder if the birds would eat it in the winter like they do beef suet and deer carcass.. Most birds that eat fats don't seem to mind gross stuff.
melt it and throw some meal worms in there and mold it in little squares you would have food for the birds all winter..
 

perchie.girl

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You could also make fire starters with it.... rolled up cardboard soaked with fat of any kind is an excellent fire starter.

Lard is also good to use on the bottoms of horses feet to keep snow from balling and or mud from sticking. It can also be rubbed in to the coronary band to help promote healthy moisturized growth.

deb
 

whogroomer

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I was always under the impression that when you make soap out of it, the lye pretty much destroys all the smell anyway. At least that's what I have observed when I've made soap in the past. At the very least you could make soap that is more for utility purposes. I wouldn't think your skins are ruined either if your giong to tan them, unless they are truely rotted. They might not be so pleasant to work with while scraping / tanning.
 

pepper48_98

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Will this work with olive, corn and peanut oil as well? I have several bottles that I have saved for making soap after it got old. I will try it and see what happens. It will be nothing lost because I will have to through it away if I can't get rid of the smell. I will try it and let ya know.
 

Annie Carvalho

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I've washed rancid lard then used it for soap.
I just put it in a big pot with water, bring it to a boil, then cool it and lift the hardened lard off.
Do this as many times as you need to until it smells good again.
Usually twice does it.
 
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