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Red potatoes — have any favourites you grow?

Discussion in 'Gardening On Your Homestead' started by Joel_BC, Nov 2, 2018.

  1. Nov 8, 2018
    Beekissed

    Beekissed Mountain Sage

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    Here's a link to read about different red varieties, some of which are grown commercially due to the high yield and some they have to grow a certain way to get smaller, more uniform spuds for commercial sale.

    I find the Red Pontiacs to be a larger, high yield variety, which is one reason we have always grown them.

    I've never seen much high yield or large potatoes when growing Yukon Golds nor did I particularly enjoy their flavor or texture. Do they grow differently where you live, Joel?
     
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  2. Nov 8, 2018
    wyoDreamer

    wyoDreamer Almost Self-Reliant

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    When I grew Yukon Golds a few years ago, I ended up with an OK crop of medium-large sized potatoes - about 3". The flavor was good, but they seemed to take a little longer to dry off before storing. I harvest my potatoes, then let them air dry in deep shade until they seem dry enough to store.
     
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  3. Nov 8, 2018
    Joel_BC

    Joel_BC Super Self-Sufficient

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    I think of the Yukons as a "serviceable" large, and (normally) good yielding variety. We've never disliked their flavor, Bee. The Russets are "okay" flavor-wise, good-yielding, but when baked they're just dry-ish (begging for gravy, lots of butter, sour-cream dressing or whatever). Even when boiled for mashed potatoes they turn out pretty dry, which improves with the addition of milk at the mashing stage.

    We've been happy enough with the Yukons... grown on sandy-silty soil, to which we amend with sulphur, and having a humus level that's pretty good and which we nurture each year. Could be some sort of environmental differences (soil, micro-climate... who knows?)
    I'd say our experience with the drying/curing time for the Yukons is similar to yours.
     

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