Beekissed

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Here's something that works and works well for your human aggressive rooster if you follow through and do it with attitude. I work more in a preventative manner with cockerels I raise but many don't have a clue about that or they receive roosters from elsewhere that are already set in their behavior patterns, so many, many posts on these forums about what to do with a rooster that starts attacking humans.

Most will receive advice to cook the bird, carry it around and "shame" him in that manner, hand feed it more so it sees you as a friendly food giver, etc.

When is the last time anyone saw one rooster holding another as he walked around doing his daily chores? That doesn't even compute in his brain case. Chickens respond to chicken behaviors, not human behaviors. Treat him as one chicken would to another...in this case a dominant rooster would do to a subordinate. And dress for the job..other chickens have scales and feathers, so put some cloth on your legs as protection. This kind of behavior modification doesn't take long but it does take a confident manner and consistent behavior from all humans who walk into that coop and no one feels confident when they are only wearing shorts around a crazy acting rooster .

Make him give you space at all times, even when he's making friendly. Roosters don't commonly make friendly with one another unless they were raised together and have already established pecking order. When you turn your back, keep one eye on your nether regions...you can bet all the chickens do the same thing which is why it's hard to catch a normal, untamed chicken. Don't be on the defensive...dominant birds never are on the defensive. They are always the aggressors and they act first, not last.

Watch your birds as they interact and eat...watch what the dominant hens do to the subordinate ones. They make them MOVE. The lesser hens are always on the look out for the dominant ones because they have already learned this one principle "If I do not move away from this food, this roost, or this nest right now, she is going to peck me...but HARD". The lesser hens eat with while keeping a wary eye over their shoulder...and your rooster needs to be feeling exactly that way when you get done with your behavior modification.

Find yourself a light weight but sturdy rod about 4-5 ft. in length and take a chair into your coop/run where you feed. Sit down, get comfy. Keep your wand at ready and when the rooster approaches "your' hens, give him a peck. If he doesn't move and move fast, stand up and peck him harder...then move towards him calmly and surely, and keep pecking him until he's on the run. Sit back down and watch. Don't let him at the feed or near your hens..you should be able to accomplish that now with just a point in his direction with your wand.

Now, while you are doing this your hens may be running around and freaking out but they will soon realize they are not the target and you can see them visibly relax as they realize he is your target. Be calm, don't move fast but move decidedly and with purpose. Stare at him and don't take your eyes from him.

Then, let him come into eat...let him get comfy eating and not getting pecked. When he's the most unaware of you, give the floor next to him a resounding WHACK with that rod, hard enough to make him jump and run. If he comes back to eat, peck him until he leaves the premises. Stand up and "hold" him in the corner with your presence and with your rod...don't corner him but just hold. If he is facing you as if to challenge, advance and peck him until he's running for his life. If he is pacing back and forth, trying to get away from your presence, your work there is done for the day. Exit stage left/right and let him eat.

The next day when you go in to feed, walk directly towards him with your wand until he is moving, moving, moving. Preferably move him out of the coop into the run and don't let him back in until you are done feeding. Don't let him in until you are ready to leave.

If all of this is working, don't think your job is done. Keep acting like you own this coop, that no 2 ft feather duster is going to rule your roost and every chance you get surprise him with a touch, a lunge in his direction or a peck from your wand until he is moving away from you quickly. That's how the big boys do it and, until now, that's what he's been doing to you...the sneak attack, the attempts to get you to MOVE and run away, inducing fear until you have to worry about attacks from behind.

Don't feed him treats. When is the last time anyone ever saw a dominant rooster call over another rooster and let him eat the goodies he just found? Nope. That is only reserved for the hens. Let the hens eat goodies, keep the rooster away from the treats. He can pick up any crumbs that are left when you and your hens move off.

Just turn the tables on him and he should settle right down. Then remember to keep him looking over his shoulder with the occasional peck or jump at him out of nowhere so he doesn't relax around you. And that's how the big boys do it. Soon you won't need the wand, just your confidence and presence should do it but I find it's a little fun to sit down in the coop and have a "train your rooster session" just to see if they still remember. It's good entertainment!
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This is from a post I wrote long ago on BYC but it seems to be quoted quite often there, so I brought it here for our forum, just in case someone can use the info. This will work on singles, doubles and even whole groups of roosters if it's needed and you don't even need a rod to utilize this information...I've done it with a feed bucket before and modified the behavior of 13 strange to me, older roosters all at once. I've used just my own presence on a rooster on his own territory before, just to stop him crowing constantly around an event being held there. It works if you work it and are steady, calm at all times and have a real purpose in your actions.

This is also effective to train roosters on small children and the children can participate, which also helps reinforce the behavior modification.
 

goatgurl

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Bee, I have used the same type of method for years with my roosters and it works so well. I start when they are young making them move away from me and the girls and by the time they are grown they stay away from me. I also will squirt them with the power spray from the garden hose. when i'm around they are always on their toes. amuses me.
 

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We've done all of this with my roo, and he goes after my husband once in a great while. He's stubborn, what do I say? Anyway the real change in his behavior (for the better) was when we started having our dog "herd" him away from us. He doesn't like that one bit. And the garden hose too, that helps!
 

Beekissed

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Bee, I have used the same type of method for years with my roosters and it works so well. I start when they are young making them move away from me and the girls and by the time they are grown they stay away from me. I also will squirt them with the power spray from the garden hose. when i'm around they are always on their toes. amuses me.

And it's just that easy, isn't it? But most people have this strange idea of being "friends" with all their chickens and don't want them to "fear" them. It's more about respect than it is fear, though all chickens should instinctively fear humans and that's a normal thing. If they do not, they've been dulled to their natural instincts as a prey animal.

I watch how the flock does it and I just join in that behavior when it comes to male chickens....they need to know they are not the leader in that barnyard or they get a little confused and start trying to assert themselves on the humans, on the dogs, on the cats, etc. Soon they become a little tyrant and a terrorist, sort of like a spoiled brat child.

When cockerels are still yet young but are starting to show their male characteristics, the adult flock starts to discipline them in the pecking order....they are the first to be driven down off the roosts by the hens. These are the guys I find trying to sleep in the nest boxes after mama has stopped watching out for them on the roosts.

I don't see anything wrong in my doing the same thing to the young cockerels, especially one that I plan to keep as my flock master. While young he needs to know the pecking order includes humans and that we control all the other species on the land. When he gets that, you never have a problem with him for the rest of his life.
 

baymule

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I like this post! While I had chickens for years, it was in town, so no rooster. I was happy to not have a rooster until last year when one of my EE chicks turned out to be a rooster. I left the EE hens with him, got an incubator and now have two batches of "teenaged" chicks growing off. But I HATE that rooster and he HATES me! I will put him in the stew pot and try this on the next rooster that I decide to keep. My EE roo is mean, has got me several times and I go in with a 4' tree branch to whallop him with. He fears that club and I make him MOVE! :lol::lol:
 

Beekissed

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I like this post! While I had chickens for years, it was in town, so no rooster. I was happy to not have a rooster until last year when one of my EE chicks turned out to be a rooster. I left the EE hens with him, got an incubator and now have two batches of "teenaged" chicks growing off. But I HATE that rooster and he HATES me! I will put him in the stew pot and try this on the next rooster that I decide to keep. My EE roo is mean, has got me several times and I go in with a 4' tree branch to whallop him with. He fears that club and I make him MOVE! :lol::lol:

I'd practice on this one for a bit before you get a new one, Bay. Sounds like he doesn't fear that club much if he's still attacking you, so maybe go on the offensive for awhile and set aside training sessions when neither of you are fresh from the battle?

Could also be the breed....some breeds are just smarter than others, less volatile and easier to train maybe. ;)

If you've got young males in this batch of chicks, it's never too soon to start training them too. Don't want to leave it too late and end up in the same situation.
 

baymule

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I won't be keeping any of the roosters. I really don't want to raise EE's, they are only so-so layers. But since I had fertile eggs.....
 

moxies_chickennuggets

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Awww....my 3 adult roos are good boys!! I never did the babying thing either. Now, since I have started raising poultry in 2011, a few bad/ill tempered ones have hatched. We did eat those boys. But the remainder are all good tempered roosters. I currently have 2 slightly older cockerels, from the 2016 hatch. So far so good. Neither has lost their heads yet.
 
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