Stink Bugs in the Garden!

Mini Horses

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BT? Haven't read the label as to bee issues.....but, an organic option. I had tomato hornworms this year and not in past. :idunno Plus this year garden in area never before used for that. I try to keep chickens out when young plants, as they will destroy most but, once established, they will pick bugs off. Some vegs are also attractive to them -- you lose some, especially low ones -- especially ripe tomatoes.

Now, low fruits on figs, blueberries, etc. -- chicken magnets!! Fence them out or you get none of the harvest. ;) I have that problem with my young comfrey plants, too. When larger the plants withstand the eating of lower leaves ok. Goats will devour them!

ETA: as @flowerbug mentions -- plant flowers among your veggies! Some better than others and "companion planting" in general, as some type vegs attract bugs, others don't....some combinations work to be less attractive to bugs that like one plant and not the other one, lessening impact of bugs.
 
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BT? Haven't read the label as to bee issues.....but, an organic option.
i'm not sure what stink bugs do to tomato plants, we've not had enough of them here for me to notice them being a problem.
BT is unlikely to work as stink bugs use their mouthparts to inject stuff into the fruit. It leaves these rotten sunken spots in the fruit and then they suck out the rotten bits.

I do practice perennial gardening, growing sage, rosemary, thyme, lavender, walking onions, and a few other things that I can’t think of off the top of my head. But it’s the first year with this particular garden.

Here’s a photo of a tomato that I picked three days ago which looked perfect, but it had already been pierced by stink bugs. Nearly every single tomato I picked has these sicken rotten spots. About twenty pounds of them. Stink bugs do not have any natural predators as they are invasive. Chickens do not eat them, but are not low-flying or low-crawling bugs anyways.

Also, leaf footed bugs and stink bugs are cousins and destroy crops in the same manor.
 

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Lazy Gardener

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I hope folks weren't thinking I was recommending BT for stink bugs. Entirely different class of insect. I was only listing out the things that I WOULD use in my garden/yard. BT should have NO affect on bees. AFAIK, threre are different types of BT. One for potato bugs. That just might work on stink bugs. Read label. Then, there's the BT that is used for caterpillars and the like, Cabbage worms etc.
 

Mini Horses

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I hope folks weren't thinking I was recommending BT for stink bugs. Entirely different class of insect. I was only listing out the things that I WOULD use in my garden/yard. BT should have NO affect on bees.
No, you didn't....I suggested BT as something to check out for organic use. Truly, this is the FIRST year I have ever bought it. It will kill a hornworm. I'm not sure what/how many of the insects & or chemicals may work -- technically -- as I normally don't have many issues. I use soapy water, some garlic, some palmolive -- pick by hand or companion plantings.

So -- you're good -- and while it may not kill them, they don't seem to like to be around it! Often, that's all that's needed -- it's what companion planting relies on.
 

baymule

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BT is unlikely to work as stink bugs use their mouthparts to inject stuff into the fruit. It leaves these rotten sunken spots in the fruit and then they suck out the rotten bits.

I do practice perennial gardening, growing sage, rosemary, thyme, lavender, walking onions, and a few other things that I can’t think of off the top of my head. But it’s the first year with this particular garden.

Here’s a photo of a tomato that I picked three days ago which looked perfect, but it had already been pierced by stink bugs. Nearly every single tomato I picked has these sicken rotten spots. About twenty pounds of them. Stink bugs do not have any natural predators as they are invasive. Chickens do not eat them, but are not low-flying or low-crawling bugs anyways.

Also, leaf footed bugs and stink bugs are cousins and destroy crops in the same manor.
Stinkbugs hit my tomatoes too. But i planted so many, that i still have gobs of tomatoes. I just cut out the bad parts. I picked 17 tomatoes last evening and 29 this morning. I peeled and de-seeded bunch of them this evening and put in the freezer. I'll make spaghetti sauce later. My tomatoes are about 12' high now, it's crazy. Best tomato year in 6 years!

I hate stink bugs.
 

flowerbug

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Stinkbugs hit my tomatoes too. But i planted so many, that i still have gobs of tomatoes. I just cut out the bad parts. I picked 17 tomatoes last evening and 29 this morning. I peeled and de-seeded bunch of them this evening and put in the freezer. I'll make spaghetti sauce later. My tomatoes are about 12' high now, it's crazy. Best tomato year in 6 years!

I hate stink bugs.
yay! :)
 

flowerbug

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massive tomato worms this season. i no longer care to find them all because when i do go out to look i'm not seeing them. later on i can sometimes find one or two.

today we picked our third picking and it was seven buckets full which comes to about 140lbs worth. some were not quite ready so those were set aside for later when they get a bit more red to them, the rest i managed to turn into 22 quarts of tomato juice this evening and i still have what is left to turn into tomato chunks tomorrow morning. the plants aren't doing that good in terms of how they look, very diseased and losing most of their leaves but it will still be an adequate harvest and i will have no complaints. in a few more days we should be able to pick another 100-150lbs more.

oh, and some creature(s) are eating chunks out of them at times, but the traps are coming up with mice and not any other creature. likely raccoon which knows better about the traps we use and that we bait them with peanut butter.
 

CrealCritter

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massive tomato worms this season. i no longer care to find them all because when i do go out to look i'm not seeing them. later on i can sometimes find one or two.

today we picked our third picking and it was seven buckets full which comes to about 140lbs worth. some were not quite ready so those were set aside for later when they get a bit more red to them, the rest i managed to turn into 22 quarts of tomato juice this evening and i still have what is left to turn into tomato chunks tomorrow morning. the plants aren't doing that good in terms of how they look, very diseased and losing most of their leaves but it will still be an adequate harvest and i will have no complaints. in a few more days we should be able to pick another 100-150lbs more.

oh, and some creature(s) are eating chunks out of them at times, but the traps are coming up with mice and not any other creature. likely raccoon which knows better about the traps we use and that we bait them with peanut butter.
Water BT, Palmolive green original mix in a spray bottle. Horn worms be gone.
 
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