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Wattle fencing

Discussion in 'DIY - Do-It-Yourself Projects, Construction, Etc.' started by Beekissed, Mar 12, 2019.

  1. Mar 12, 2019
    Beekissed

    Beekissed Mountain Sage

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    After pricing fencing for the sheep paddocks I intend to develop, I am exploring cheaper options that I can do here at home. I'd likely use T posts for my actual fence support but am contemplating making wattle fence panels. Here's a tutorial on it and I'll do further searches for vids on the same.

    I've got the time and materials here, though nothing as smooth as what they are using, and I've always wanted a wattle fence around the garden as well and was intending on doing that this year, so this is just a step further and using it for sheep. They've been doing it for thousand of years all over the world, so why not here?

    https://www.forgottenwayfarms.com/forgotten-way-farms-blog/make-wattle-fencing-step-by-step
     
    Hinotori likes this.
  2. Mar 12, 2019
    Lazy Gardener

    Lazy Gardener Almost Self-Reliant

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    Bee, it looks like a LOT of work, but it sure is pretty. When I was in Guatemala, I was taken by the living fences. I wonder if that would be an option for you? That would provide some shade, fencing, and perhaps down the road... some fire wood. In the mean time, I bet electric fencing would be your cheapest and easiest set up, and it would be fairly easy to move to give them new pasture.
     
  3. Mar 12, 2019
    Beekissed

    Beekissed Mountain Sage

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    I know! Isn't it cool? :celebrate I've changed how I do things around here and am attempting to build more strength around my skeletal framework so as to support my joints better as I age. I NEED the extra work, particular lifting, tugging, pounding type work, so this is perfect. I also have the time and materials. I love to create beautiful things and I've always thought that wattle is beautiful. It's all so perfect in how it came together that I can't do anything BUT do the wattle fencing! :)

    Sheep don't do so well with basic electric fencing....been there, done that. Unless it's high tensile 4 strand or the electronetting~again, both very costly, plus the cost of the solar charger~it will not hold them in. Their wooly coat/fur seems to make them impervious to a single or double strand fence and they will just go under it or through it at will. And they will do this in a sheer panic if they get "bit" by the wire on the more tender areas and will run like a deer to get away from the place they got bit....if it's just a couple strands all around they will just burst right through that.

    Meanwhile, it's just a couple of young lambs who will be penned at the sheep shed on hay until they get acclimated and the grass gets heavier around here. When I'm satisfied that Ben is good with them, they with him, that I can handle them all over and they see me as their shepherd, I'll shepherd them on the lawn while I work outside...on their fence! :D

    I'll develop smaller paddocks and interconnect them later by removing panels. Wattle fencing has been used forever over in the UK to contain sheep, so I have no doubts mine will do the same.

    Just think of the satisfaction I'll get from having built my own fence! :woot
     
  4. Mar 12, 2019
    Lazy Gardener

    Lazy Gardener Almost Self-Reliant

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    Bee, you are naughty. You've sent me on a Wattle Fencing bunny trail, on a morning when I have other pressing matters. I found the following site. Below the poster's "how to" photos are some wild photos of Wattle fencing from all over the globe! I forgive you. Thanks for a fantastic bunny trail. Now... I find myself wondering how I can use wattle, and perhaps wattle and daub to make a lovely creation in my yard.

    https://insteading.com/blog/wattle-fence/
     
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  5. Mar 12, 2019
    Beekissed

    Beekissed Mountain Sage

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    Aren't all those simply lovely???? I think I had posted such wattle fences from all over the world here some time ago but couldn't find the thread again. Mine will no WAY look as beautiful as some of those, but who knows? Down the road I could get real good at this and when I do it to my garden I may have more finesse by then. :D

    I don't think I have the right wood/saplings to do it the traditional way of bending the branches around the ends to interweave them and lock the wattle in place but I'll certainly try it...you have to twist some types of wood a bit to break up the fibers before bending. Barring that, I'll screw the bottom and top wattle to the uprights.
     
  6. Mar 12, 2019
    Lazy Gardener

    Lazy Gardener Almost Self-Reliant

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    You don't have to use the branches/saplings to bend around the end posts. You could use some native vining material to do so. I know there are some vines that grow around here that could be woven in to tie the ends together. I find myself even wondering if night shade could be used. I know it is noxious, even poisonous. But, wondering that if once dried it might be ok as fencing material. In no way, am I saying that it would be ok to use nightshade. But just suggesting that type of vine as an option. Or you could use some type of twine. Maybe you can find someone who has a weeping willow tree that you could harvest from.

    You could also boil the wood where you want it to bend. I know that is a common process when bending cedar strips for canoes, and other wood for bent wood furniture.
     
  7. Mar 12, 2019
    Beekissed

    Beekissed Mountain Sage

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    Nah...too fussy and boiling that much water is a waste of time. I'll be content to lock down the panels by using screws in the top and bottom sapling.

    I've got an ad in the locals right now asking for any bamboo I can harvest. Many people plant that and don't realize how invasive and tall it can get, so it would be nice if someone wants their whole grove cut and removed.
     
  8. Mar 12, 2019
    milkmansdaughter

    milkmansdaughter Super Self-Sufficient

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    Ive also been looking at this recently @Beekissed , and I think I even have a source for bamboo. Barring that, I was thinking of some of the really thick wild grape vines that grow everywhere around here. I too would probably plan on using t-posts for the supports. And even just buying the t-posts would be a chunk of money to fence in the area I am hoping to enclose. I'm glad you mentioned the problems with electric fencing for sheep!

    Fencing costs can add up really quick!
     
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  9. Mar 12, 2019
    wyoDreamer

    wyoDreamer Almost Self-Reliant

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    I was thinking about doing a living fence for an area that I want to make pasture.
    upload_2019-3-12_16-6-20.png
    Still trying to talk DH into getting a couple of steer to raise. But let it grow for a few years before adding beef - it should hold them in.
     
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  10. Mar 12, 2019
    Hinotori

    Hinotori Super Self-Sufficient

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    I love the wattle look.

    I've been talking with hubby about putting in a living fence of willow across the front of the property. It will grow everywhere except in the stream and maybe I could make willow wattle for that spot.
     

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