What do you forage?

Perris

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I've also tried a lot of the edible wild plants round here, and concluded that there is a good reason why most of them are not cultivated - they don't taste very nice or they're not worth the effort of collecting/prepping. I have yet to try the wild parsnip.
We are inundated with wild garlic in the spring, which is OK, and elder flowers and berries are lovely. But the chickens always get the wild strawberries before I can, the squirrels get the good hazelnuts likewise, and none of us seem to be fans of blackberries, which also grow in abundance here.
 

tortoise

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I've also tried a lot of the edible wild plants round here, and concluded that there is a good reason why most of them are not cultivated - they don't taste very nice or they're not worth the effort of collecting/prepping.
You're not lying 🤣 DH and I planted some native edible berries and they are disgustingly horrible. Probably cant kill ya 'cause no one has ever been able to consume enough 🤣
 
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Hinotori

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We dig Pacific razor clams. They are big enough to be well worth it. Cleaning them is fairly quick once you have the technique down. They are one of the clams you gut, and you cut open both valves in the neck to wash out the dirt. I have a little pair of shrimp scissors that works awesome.

Dip in simmering water until shell pops open. Dunk in ice water. Pull off shell. Snip tip of neck. Slice open valves. Cut foot mostly in half and pull gut off. Rinse and use or freeze. Takes me only a couple minutes per clam.

Both of us getting our limit of 15 each usually results in just over 4 pounds of cleaned clam meat.
 
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