which one of you poisoned your garden?

Chic Rustler

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which one of you guys was it that munched with some treated hay and killed your garden soil? and how is it doing now?
 

CrealCritter

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which one of you guys was it that munched with some treated hay and killed your garden soil? and how is it doing now?
I did that once but it was a long time ago. I ended up abandoning the garden for a new one. It was free city leaf mulch from the landfill absolutely beautiful black mulch but toxic as the land around fukushima Japan. Sometimes city ordinances, have good intentions but they don't think it all the way through.
 

frustratedearthmother

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I started a thread a few years back titled "Killer Compost/Murderous Mulch." I mulched at one time with hay that was sprayed with a herbicide. I moved my garden to a different spot twice since then. The original spot has been home to pigs for several years now. I'll give it a try in that spot again eventually. Now I question hay producers before I buy hay and I won't buy hay that's been treated with herbicides.
 

Chic Rustler

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I started a thread a few years back titled "Killer Compost/Murderous Mulch." I mulched at one time with hay that was sprayed with a herbicide. I moved my garden to a different spot twice since then. The original spot has been home to pigs for several years now. I'll give it a try in that spot again eventually. Now I question hay producers before I buy hay and I won't buy hay that's been treated with herbicides.

yes that was the thread! it's been a couple years, surely the herbicide is gone by now??? idk
 

frustratedearthmother

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It hopefully is. I think I recall that sunlight helps break it down... maybe? Running pigs there for several years now has ensured that the soil has been turned and exposed to sunlight quite a bit now. And fertilized... they fertilized it quite a bit also. ;)
 

Chic Rustler

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It hopefully is. I think I recall that sunlight helps break it down... maybe? Running pigs there for several years now has ensured that the soil has been turned and exposed to sunlight quite a bit now. And fertilized... they fertilized it quite a bit also. ;)

I bet the pigs have got that place plowed pretty good!!
 

CrealCritter

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I bet the pigs have got that place plowed pretty good!!
The little one I had nose, was like a flat bottom plow. I was happy to get it in the freezer. I think my wife has happier than I was since she had to chase it home many times with a big stick. She could smack some pig ass with a stick I tell you.
 

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Wow. Never heard of tree leaves being an issue. But... I suppose any thing is possible. It gives me cause for concern when I open up a bag of leaves (I pick them up in a near by town) and find it laced with grass clippings. I always source my hay from a neighbor farmer who assures me that the fields he hays are herbicide free. I don't know what I'll do when he retires. The biggest reason why I have chickens is for the MANURE. Eggs are a wonderful side benefit. I would like to turn 1/4 acre into a "hay field" which I would harvest with a scythe. 3 cuttings/season would provide all the hay I need.
 

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