Winter car supplies for Zone 4

k15n1

Almost Self-Reliant
Joined
Nov 28, 2010
Messages
971
Reaction score
19
Points
115
I'm in MN and it's really winter now. I put blankets in the car today.

I'm thinking of putting the backpacking stove in the trunk, too. In a situation where you can keep warm, the next problem is water. Packing snow into a pan and melting it with a small stove is one solution. I have a Dragonfly-type stove and I usually burn kerosine. Are there any drawbacks to this? Fuel in the passenger compartment isn't the best...

After water, calories are next. I'm thinking candy, ramen, jerky, and other high-calorie foods that keep well.

What else should I have?

So far, I have a printer-paper box filled with a blanket for each person. I think I could have, at most, 1 more box that size before DW starts getting concerned.
 

Beekissed

Mountain Sage
Joined
Jul 12, 2008
Messages
12,382
Reaction score
2,923
Points
417
Location
Mountains of WV
k15n1 said:
I'm in MN and it's really winter now. I put blankets in the car today.

I'm thinking of putting the backpacking stove in the trunk, too. In a situation where you can keep warm, the next problem is water. Packing snow into a pan and melting it with a small stove is one solution. I have a Dragonfly-type stove and I usually burn kerosine. Are there any drawbacks to this? Fuel in the passenger compartment isn't the best...

After water, calories are next. I'm thinking candy, ramen, jerky, and other high-calorie foods that keep well.

What else should I have?

So far, I have a printer-paper box filled with a blanket for each person. I think I could have, at most, 1 more box that size before DW starts getting concerned.
My car kit usually includes, both winter and summer, a jug of water, lighters, flashlights, knives, various tools, blanket, small tarp, food, trash bags, Walmart bags, rags, baby wipes, paper towels.

Candy, low salt crackers, peanut butter and granola bars would be good, but jerky can sure make you thirstier than you need to be in a situation like that. They make heated blankets that plug into cig lighters but don't know how long the average car battery would energize one. I like real down comforters for such things...they compress way down into small packages but feel like a heated blanket when placed upon you and don't require electricity.

A urinal is also a good thing to have..opening that car door just to pee can sure let in a lot of cold air and the doors may freeze shut, disallowing bathroom events anyway. The trash bags can come in real handy for bathroom needs and smell containment.

http://www.amazon.com/Roadpro-12-Volt-Fleece-Heated-Blanket/dp/B0009Y2CFS
 

Britesea

Sustainability Master
Joined
Jul 22, 2011
Messages
4,351
Reaction score
2,660
Points
333
Location
Klamath County, OR
Having some extra gasoline could be a lifesaver, but it's too volatile. Here's a link for something that would be a good substitute for that, and they claim it's safe to store. http://www.mymagictank.com/

Instead of a stove and kerosene, you might consider making an alcohol stove. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xisVbmV48ug (I would include a terra cotta plant saucer as further insulation from the heat of the can- most car materials are synthetics that might melt)

You can save space by placing the blankets and extra clothing in one of those vacuum seal bags. And if you keep everything packed in one of those plastic "milk crate" type containers, you can saw the crate into pieces and use them as traction mats (did I mention that a saw, axe, and rope would be good to have)

If you have a way to melt snow for water, then you can also heat up the water and make a hot meal- including some backpacker type freeze-dried meals, powdered soups, cocoa, coffee and teabags could really help with morale; plus you can keep your core temperature up more easily with hot food and drink rather than cold. Electolytes help with dehydration- powdered Tang or Gatorade is a good thing to have on hand winter and summer.
 

k15n1

Almost Self-Reliant
Joined
Nov 28, 2010
Messages
971
Reaction score
19
Points
115
I think of myself as a good driver but I've had trouble getting up hills a few times since we moved out to the sticks. Does anyone else have chains? I have some and am wondering if it'd be worth putting them in the car.

When I was reading about this topic, I found this link (below) to a rubber traction device that you can put on without moving your vehicle. I wonder if there is a DIY version of this.

http://www.flextrax.com/
 

Hinotori

Super Self-Sufficient
Joined
Nov 2, 2011
Messages
2,559
Reaction score
1,932
Points
293
Location
Washington
We carry a set of chains in each truck in winter. If we are going over the pass, we will pull the set out of one truck and carry two with us. We have blankets, water, flashlight, TP, paper towels, and hand warmers in both vehicles summer and winter. In winter we will carry food when on trips.

I've thought about a Kelly Kettle. They are a bit expensive, but I love how you can burn twigs and small things in them.
 
Top