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Bamboo

Discussion in 'Trash To Treasure - Joys Of Recycling' started by Oldmax51, Oct 6, 2011.

  1. Nov 9, 2013
    ~gd

    ~gd Lovin' The Homestead

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    Whole villages are built out of it in the far east. If you can grow it. read up on it It is an AWSOME family of plants.
     
  2. Nov 9, 2013
    Emerald

    Emerald Lovin' The Homestead

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    OMGOODNESS!!! {looks around to make sure no one is looking}:hide I agree with ~gd!! I have a few pieces of clothing that are 100% bamboo and the more I wear and wash them the softer and nicer they are to wear! I've had the oldest hoodie for about 3 years(at least this is the third summer I can find pic of me wearing it) and other than a couple of spots( what can I say.. I am a messy person I have to hide good clothing from myself almost to keep it spot free). The ones I have are thinner long sleeved hooded t-shirt style from a local casino. They are warm enuf to wear in the winter but in the summer they keep you quite cool too. they seem very well suited to the hot and humid we have in Michigan. I wore one of them out fishing even tho it was hot due to a bit of sunburn. it shielded me from the sun but didn't seem to cook me much. I hope everyone finds a piece of bamboo clothing to try. I would like more but got these for free and can not afford to buy them out right yet.
    I did a bunch of research in bamboo when I saw all the new bamboo stuff come on the market. I found that the good bamboo in the right areas can be planted and grown out for 3 years and then they can harvest almost one third of the plant a year for quite a few years. much more sustainable than most hardwoods or eve softwoods.

    So I have been slowly picking up bamboo pieces to replace wooden ones.

    The very first thing that I can remember buying once I knew more about bamboo growing was the clothes pins. I spent about $4.50 for 150 pins. (I think they were $1.47 for 50 and I got three boxes-and the store had boxes of 95 for $3.47.. :barnie Who does their math? No really? who!!!!) and since I am the clothes pins worst enemy I set a resolve for myself I got a Nail apron free from the lumbar yard and put all my clothes pins in there and don't ever ever leave them on the line any more and open to the elements. I was going thru wooden ones every year(I'm sure I would have gotten more mileage from them if I had taken them in like I do the bamboo) I have had them for quite a while now and just love the bamboo clothing pins. they stay firm and stiff even after a few years. and yes I have had them get wet during quick pop up storms where we missed the laundry in the rush to get stuff tied or stowed. They dried out and don't seem to really have any rot on them. I did find one in the yard under the lines this spring. must have been dropped and missed. it is dirty colored now more of a gray than the nice yellow but still seems sturdy and it still works.. I'm thinking about leaving just that one out there to see how it fares in the harsh weather.

    I have cutting boards now too. make sure to get the good ones. I got one at a flea market for $5 and once it gets a bit damp it swells (and get very fine splinters when it swells along the edge)and is not as smooth as the more expensive one that I have. I also have switched to the bamboo cooking spoons instead of wood. they last longer(as long as I don't catch them on fire that is.. ;) ) clean to looking nicer-they darken as they age but they don't get icky looking like the wooden spoons I have.

    I also read that they are trying to "fluff" the bamboo fibers and use them as insulation along with coco fiber or coir from coconuts. but now can not find that article.
    I know that I have more bamboo stuff but other than the normal garden stakes/plant stakes I can not remember them tonight..
     
  3. Feb 25, 2014
    Sapphire Skyline

    Sapphire Skyline Frugally lurking

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    I agree with you, austintgraf, on the versatility of the bamboo. I have a large amount of it growing in my back yard around my chicken coop, for shade. Yes, the shoots are edible. Only learning this after seeing my hens eating them and freaking out! !
    I've also made fencing for privacy, garden poles, curtain hanging, and simple decor in and outside of the house. I've learned how to cut the shoots so they re-root themselves, for replanting and sharing. If you want different shapes? While they are nice and tender green, start the shaping process, using floral green tape. You will need to replace the tape, as it dries out, so you don't lose the shape, once the bamboo has tuffned, use wire to keep it shaped. Once you have achived your desired shape, cut it. I have been growing a trestle.
    Thanks to all for reading this long winded post! LOL
     
  4. Mar 3, 2014
    the_whingnut

    the_whingnut Almost Self-Reliant

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    There are two types of bamboo. Running and clumping. The running kind is the invasive one. Makes great fire wood if you split the pockets!
     
  5. Mar 3, 2014
    Hinotori

    Hinotori Super Self-Sufficient

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    Ive wondered how good it was for burning.
     
  6. Feb 6, 2016
    sumi

    sumi Sustainability Master Administrator

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    Ceilings :)

    IMG_0034.JPG

    Bamboo and reeds are commonly used in some parts of South Africa as ceilings and also tied in a similar fashion to wire fences, to block road dust, keep critters out and for privacy. The above pic was taken in a very old mud house that was left to fall to ruins, but as you can see the ceilings were still in excellent condition.
     
    rhoda_bruce and the_whingnut like this.
  7. Feb 7, 2016
    rhoda_bruce

    rhoda_bruce Almost Self-Reliant

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    I have some small rooms I need to deal with the ceilings in.....wonder if I can put something like that together. My family has a patch of bamboo I can harvest from.
     
  8. Feb 7, 2016
    Britesea

    Britesea Sustainability Master

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    Very attractive too. Does bamboo have much trouble with insects though?
     
  9. Feb 7, 2016
    sumi

    sumi Sustainability Master Administrator

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    @Britesea none at all. I forgot to mention above that they get painted with a clear varnish before fitting as ceilings. It's extremely durable and it looks very nice! I've visited many houses, old and new, with these type of ceilings. What's even more attractive is if you fit thinnish tree trunks as beams below them… Remove the bark, let them dry out thoroughly, varnish and fit. Beautiful!
     
    rhoda_bruce likes this.
  10. Feb 7, 2016
    Mini Horses

    Mini Horses Super Self-Sufficient

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    Bamboo is also very sturdy. Make great trellis for veggies, flowers and decoration. I used to have some beautiful Bamboo furniture when I had my condo in Florida. It's really hard wood.
     

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