Breed distinction

ChickenMomma91

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I don’t have photos at the moment but I’ll get some when I get home.
I have two hens who were sold to me as ameracaunas. I don’t care is she was wrong but one lays a bright blue eggs and the other more of a greenish blue. I’m thinking one is actually an auracauna ( I know my spelling is probably wrong). One is fat/fluffy (hence why she was named marshmallow peep) and the other is skinny almost rooster looking. Thoughts?
 

Hinotori

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Araucana are distictive from ameraucana. They are tailless and usually have ear turfs.
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Ameraucana have beards and muffs. If it's not a named color (not someones fanciful names for mixed colors), it's probably not an ameraucana.

These girls are wheaten color
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Easter eggers are mixed breed that have ameraucana, araucana, or cream legbar in their background. They have a chance to lay any color of egg because of this mix of genetics. I've had brown, pink, green, blue, olive, and speckled green. Because I've seen the question too many times, each hen only lays one color.

The body shape is all over the place and they may or may not have beards. A lot of the hatchery birds Ive had it's been obvious they had leghorn in their genetics.

Hatchery americana/araucana/ameraucana are actually a separate creature from barnyard easter eggers. They are not mixes of ameraucana or araucana. They are decended from the original mixed breed birds brought from South America. Hatcheries have crossed them with other breeds to increase egg production, hence the all over body shape. Most hatchery birds are a basic wild type partridge in color.

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Hinotori

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Easter eggers. Mixed color. Both carry blue so they dont quite have the typical color.

Actual ameraucana breeders do not ever mix colors. They may breed in a new color then they work diligently to get back to standard as fast as they can. Ive had birds sold to me as Easter eggers from color projects. Breeder was making lavender ameraucana and buff ameraucana. They mostly looked ameraucana but weren't quite right in body shape.


There is a huge range of acceptable for blue in the ameraucana standard. Ameraucana breeders club sells these on cardstock so you can compare eggs and get the color.
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The silver ameraucana I had all laid more of a greenish. The wheaten have all laid a very nice blue. I like wheaten best as they are the most laid back of the colors. Yes temperament actually differs slightly between the colors. They are mostly the same. They are also clannish and stick to their own colors.
 

Lazy Gardener

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Well done @Hinotori . It's a pet peeve for me that even the hatcheries can't seem to get their act together in properly labeling these birds. The only other comment I have to make is the fact that Araucana carry a lethal gene. I'm not sure it's carried on the ear tuft site, or on the rumpless site. But, either way, b/c of this lethal gene, many eggs fail to develop, or die prior to hatch. I'm thinking that if male and female both
carry the lethal gene, that half of the chicks will fail to survive. For this very reason, I would never willingly bring a true Araucana into my flock. I have the same, very strong feelings about crested chickens or water fowl. When it comes to breeding, my philosophy is: Just because you can... don't mean you should!
 

Hinotori

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It's related to the tufted gene and easily work around if you keep a few without tufts for breeding. Gene is incomplete dominant. One copy gives tufts. 2 copies and the egg won't hatch.

Even if you breed tufted to tufted, it's 25% of the eggs that don't hatch. 25% won't have tufts and 50% will have tufts.

If you breed tufted to untufted, 50% have tufts and 50% are untufted. So either way you get the same amount of tufted chicks from eggs.

Now the rumplessness causes it's own issue on all breeds with it. Makes it harder for successful matings so fertility is down.
 

Hinotori

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I thought about getting araucana years ago, but I decided on the ameraucana and was breeding wheaten and silver for a bit.

I've been concidering getting a few large fowl as my flock is just a barnyard mix mostly now. I've only been working on the silkies. The large fowl just give me pretty blue eggs. Ive been listening for anyone local with legbars and araucana. If I wait, a friend of mine will supply the legbars later in the year.
 
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