Cast Iron

tortoise

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I remember reading somewhere that flax oil has the highest smoke point. Might be a good one for seasoning, except that it also has the highest rancidity rate. That's why I prefer coconut oil- reasonable smoke point and takes a very long time to turn rancid.
A hard fat (which includes coconut oil!) is generally the best choice for cooking with heat, including seasoning a pan. They are more stable.

What is the reason for heating after oiling?
 

Hinotori

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Oh and I got Mom to start treating her non stick fry pan the same as cast iron years ago. Makes the non stick last longer. I do have one non stick fry pan I use for things like pancakes. It's wider and easier to use.
 

Grandmasporch

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I keep a tub of this lard just for my cast iron when needed, and I use coconut in-between but only when needed.

download (1).jpg IMG_0856 (2).JPG
 

Marie2020

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if nothing is sticking to that spot and it isn't otherwise bothering you i'd just keep on using it.

otherwise you can scrub that area back to the metal and then make sure it is clean and dry before applying some oil to it and then using it. eventually it may even out no matter what.

i never want to heat a pan up to where an oil reaches the smoke point. it doesn't smell very good and it doesn't usually taste all that great either. once in a while it does happen but i don't do it on purpose. ooops. :)

one way to add more black carbon to the seasoning on the pan is to cook some sugary bbq type sauces on some bacon or ham. that will often give you some nice black carbon and oil to work with. still, i don't really worry about it too much, just keep using it when i need it.

i did check out the website and there's a discrepancy between what they post in the seasoning temperature for one page and another (one says 450 - 550F another says 350 - 450F) so that's not a good thing IMO. but to me to simply state a temperature range without taking into account the smoke point of the oil used is just blah...

and yes, others can do what they like, as i said before i'm not really too wrapped up into this, the not wanting to get to the smoke point is just my own desire not to set off the smoke detectors or to smell burning oils inside the house and not liking the taste or smells when that happens. personal preferences. :)
Thanks flowerbug :)

The smog that comes with burning the oil is awful. :sick . Probably not good for breathing problems

I can't fit the pan inside my oven because the handle is two long.
I've only started using iron pans this year so still learning :)
 

Okiepan

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I remember reading somewhere that flax oil has the highest smoke point. Might be a good one for seasoning, except that it also has the highest rancidity rate. That's why I prefer coconut oil- reasonable smoke point and takes a very long time to turn rancid.
I have been using Flax seed oil for years with a cotton tshirt (cloth ) and has been doing a great job for me .
 

Britesea

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A hard fat (which includes coconut oil!) is generally the best choice for cooking with heat, including seasoning a pan. They are more stable.

What is the reason for heating after oiling?
heating AFTER oiling causes the oil to penetrate minute holes/flaws that may be in the surface- making for a smoother finish. Mine has a beautiful shine to it after all these years, and works better than any non-stick pan I've ever used (plus I can fry at a higher temp than with a non-stick pan, allowing for a good Maillard Reaction)
 
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