Cooking Lamb

tortoise

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How does one go about cooking lamb? mine is always very tough.
It depends on the cut. The leg and shoulder cuts are slow twitch muscles. https://exploratorium.edu/cooking/meat/meat-chart.html

Cook slow twitch muscles to 180 degrees or higher to break down the connective tissue and make the meat soft. Its kinda magical. Cook to 175 and you get a brick of meat (good for slicing thinly for sandwiches). It looks overcooked. Put it back in the oven and keep cooking and the connective tissue breaks down so you get soft tender meat.

The trick is to use low heat so you dont lose as much moisture during cooking. I cook roasts at 285 degrees F until they are on the verge of falling apart.
 

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I’m butchering lambs shortly, so will need ideas!

my normal lamb stew (i used to cook a lot more than i do now) starts with well trimmed lamb meat cut into chunks however big you'd like them. however as much garlic and onions as you'd like (i tend to overdo it). i brown that all and then simmer for some time to make sure it is well done and tender then i add the cut up potatoes, carrot chunks and onions (yes more onions) and enough water to steam those for a half hour and then i add in all the chopped cabbage i can fit in the pot and steam that until it is tender and then add a quart of tomato chunks right at the end. i don't usually thicken this as the potatoes do enough of that for me and i don't normally add a lot of other liquid as i want the broth to mostly be the juices from the vegetables combined with the tomatos. celery or other root vegetables can go in there too at any point as long as they have enough time to finish cooking. :)
 
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