Cooking with Canned Beans

Lazy Gardener

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Please, @Chic Rustler share your baked bean recipes. I love baked beans, and want to can them. Start to finish, dry beans, to finished jar of yum for me please. On other thread, you were talking about baked beans, plus one other recipe? I want as many home canned (jarred) bean recipes as I can get my hands on.
 

Daisy

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I dont know if I am talking about the same sort of beans, because I dont can my own but buy them canned from the shop. I swap out mince meat and use kidney beans very often in my cooking, spaghetti bolognase, lasagne, nachos, burgers.

I sometimes fry up chick peas with chicken stock and kale from the garden to have with rice. Chick peas with powdered chicken stock can sort of substitute for chicken. Chick pea and tuna patties are yum, freeze well and are easy to reheat for lazy meals or snacks. Hummus or bean dips are easy too.

I am terrible at following recipes, and make most of my food up as I go along haha. The net has all sort of recipes it can be so overwhelming.
 

flowerbug

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I dont know if I am talking about the same sort of beans, because I dont can my own but buy them canned from the shop. I swap out mince meat and use kidney beans very often in my cooking, spaghetti bolognase, lasagne, nachos, burgers.

I sometimes fry up chick peas with chicken stock and kale from the garden to have with rice. Chick peas with powdered chicken stock can sort of substitute for chicken. Chick pea and tuna patties are yum, freeze well and are easy to reheat for lazy meals or snacks. Hummus or bean dips are easy too.

I am terrible at following recipes, and make most of my food up as I go along haha. The net has all sort of recipes it can be so overwhelming.
i cook like that too, just make stuff up as i go along. recipes are only starting points for variations upon the theme as far as they go for me. i rarely make things exactly the same each time unless it is something i might share with other people. so at least i know what they can expect. for myself, i'll eat about anything so ...

i cannot get Mom to eat hummus, she had some that someone else bought at the store and hated it. she likes beans though, so what was the problem? they put roasted red peppers and hot peppers in there which of course she wouldn't like. i make mine rather plain most of the time with just a bit of mayo, garlic, lemon, olive oil added to the chick peas, and skip the tahini and salt. so i guess people would probably call it bean dip and not hummus, but it is close enough for me. :)
 

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I dont know if I am talking about the same sort of beans, because I dont can my own but buy them canned from the shop. I swap out mince meat and use kidney beans very often in my cooking, spaghetti bolognase, lasagne, nachos, burgers.

I sometimes fry up chick peas with chicken stock and kale from the garden to have with rice. Chick peas with powdered chicken stock can sort of substitute for chicken. Chick pea and tuna patties are yum, freeze well and are easy to reheat for lazy meals or snacks. Hummus or bean dips are easy too.

I am terrible at following recipes, and make most of my food up as I go along haha. The net has all sort of recipes it can be so overwhelming.
all of those ideas sound yummy.
 

framing fowl

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Oh my, this has got me remembering fermented black bean dip. I've got to make this again!

My favorite way to eat beans is as bean paste, which is a dip kind of like re-fried beans but without the fat. I am not opposed to lard (pork fat rules!) but I like the bean paste better. You just cook up some beans with onions and garlic and mash 'em up and serve in burritoes or with nachos as a dip. We had some for supper tonight with tortilla chips with melted cheddar, salsa all from the garden, and strained goat kefir flavored with garden herbs....I usually use sour cream, but recently discovered that strained kefir is a perfect substitute.

Here is what I did...I always double or triple this, but I will give you the one-bag version:

You will need....

One pound of dry black beans
One medium onion
2-3...or 5 or 9......cloves of garlic

Pick through the beans to sort out any debris or small pebbles. Soak the beans for 12 to 24 hours in a gallon of filtered water to which you have added a glug of whey or lemon juice or apple cider vinegar. This will make the beans much more digestible. Don't use the "quick soak" method that will likely be listed on the intructions on the bag.

Rinse the beans, and put in a crock pot on low overnight with enough water to cover by at least a half inch. Add the diced onion and garlic. NO SALT yet!

In the morning, drain any excess liquid, reserving a cup or two just in case. Run the beans and onions/garlic through a food processor or mash with a potato masher, as smooth or as chunky as you like. Add some of the reserved liquid to get a consistancy that you will like. Think dip.

That's it! Simple, simple, simple.....and cheap! And nutritious!

Serve it as a dip by itself, with grated cheese on top, hot, in burritoes or tacos, with nachos, etc. Include anything you like to go with these items....diced tomatoes, salsa, sour cream, guacamole, cooked sausage, etc.

You can freeze or refrigerate leftovers. I ferment it for longer storage in the fridge and a slight sour flavor that I like, and increasing the nutrient density and the digestibility....no acid reflux after a meal with fermented foods. You can ferment the salsa, too. If this intrigues you, check out the thread on fermenting.

Then I pack it in jars with LOTS of head space....3-4 inches, as it can really rise up....and add a glug of whey when I mash or blend it. Then I let it sit, covered, at room temp for 2-3 days. 3 days if the temps are in the 70's F and less if hotter. Then repack into appropriately sized jars if desired and put in the fridge indefinitely. You can also just mash up a jar of the seasoned beans and use these, unfermented, in the same way. There. No so much of a hijack now! tongue

eta: If I remember, I heavily salt the surface to help prevent mold. Forgot this time. Just scraped it off. What is underneath is still perfectly good, but once it molds, it will probably mold again, so scraping before using each time will be in order. No problem, as we eat it up pretty quickly in the summer when we don't want to heat up the kitchen by cooking and there are lots of fresh tomatoes to eat with this.
 

flowerbug

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I dont know if I am talking about the same sort of beans, because I dont can my own but buy them canned from the shop. I swap out mince meat and use kidney beans very often in my cooking, spaghetti bolognase, lasagne, nachos, burgers.

I sometimes fry up chick peas with chicken stock and kale from the garden to have with rice. Chick peas with powdered chicken stock can sort of substitute for chicken. Chick pea and tuna patties are yum, freeze well and are easy to reheat for lazy meals or snacks. Hummus or bean dips are easy too.

I am terrible at following recipes, and make most of my food up as I go along haha. The net has all sort of recipes it can be so overwhelming.
i think what you mean by "mince meat" is ground meat? here "mince meat" is actually an ingredient in some desserts. :)
 

TexasLisa

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i think what you mean by "mince meat" is ground meat? here "mince meat" is actually an ingredient in some desserts. :)
I LOVE Mince Meat pies!! In the old days minced meat was made with meat. Here is a 16th century recipe:

A 16th-century recipe
Pyes of mutton or beif must be fyne mynced & seasoned with pepper and salte and a lytel saffron to colour it / suet or marrow a good quantitie / a lytell vynegre / pruynes / great reasons / and dates / take the fattest of the broath of powdred beefe. And if you will have paest royall / take butter and yolkes of egges & so to temper the floure to make the paest.

(= Pie filling of mutton or beef must be finely minced and seasoned with pepper and salt and a little saffron to colour it. [Add] a good quantity of suet or marrow, a little vinegar, prunes, raisins and dates. [Put in] the fattest of the broth of salted beef. And, if you want Royal pastry, take butter and egg yolks and [combine them with] flour to make the paste.)[2]
 

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Here, traditional mince meat is made with venison, lard, raisins, ?dates, and finely chopped apples, brown sugar, ? molasses, ? vinegar, and other seasonings. It is then used as a filling for a pie, the likes of which you either LOVE or HATE. A tiny piece is very filling, but oh so very good when the crust is flaky, and it is served warm with whipped cream or vanilla ice cream. Such a delight can make a great "fenders" meal.

I know the question will be asked: what is a fenders meal?

Hubby: "What's for supper?"

Wife: "Fenders". Meaning: "I'm all pooched out. I'm done cooking, washing dishes, and other such never ending tasks. Fend for yourself." Sunday night, we always have fenders for supper.
 
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