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Dairy Farming

Discussion in 'Cattle' started by DollDoctor, Mar 30, 2016.

  1. Oct 25, 2016
    NH Homesteader

    NH Homesteader Super Self-Sufficient

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    Oh and according to my cheese making book you can make most cheeses with cow or goat milk, but it's harder to make hard cheeses with goat milk. I don't know though, I've only made soft cheeses so far.
     
  2. Oct 25, 2016
    lcertuche

    lcertuche Almost Self-Reliant

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    When I was a kid Mama bought milk from a lady and it would be 1/4 to 1/3 cream. We always had fresh butter. Mama would get so mad when we wouldn't shake the jar up before pouring a glass, lol. There was 8 of us counting Mama and Daddy. We would go through 4 gallons a week.
     
  3. Oct 25, 2016
    SustainableAg

    SustainableAg Lovin' The Homestead

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    I will have to try to find someone with goat milk. My fianceƩ refuses to drink goat milk, but will drink cow milk. I would love to convice him otherwise. We would have more milk than we needed with a cow! And I'm sure there is an obvious cost difference between caring for the two.
    Icertuche - that is a serious milk habit! My mom won't touch the stuff. Prefers fat free milk :sick says the stuff straight from the faucet is too thick and sweet :barnie
     
  4. Oct 25, 2016
    Mini Horses

    Mini Horses Super Self-Sufficient

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    You can buy a milk separator, $100-500.... I've seen good reviews on some from Slavic Beauty for about $150. Now, I HAVE made goat butter. Let it sit about 6 days, skim, shake in jar. It's white. You can use a mixer to make the butter. A separator is less costly than a cow :clap, I keep telling me!

    I milk into 1/2 gal canning jars. Lid & put in freezer about 45min for a fast chill, then frig. The lids for a little seal and when opened after 2 weeks was fresh and yummy. Yes, some cream had risen, not a lot, maybe an inch but in top of jar wasn't much. Anyway. was good butter & will buy separator this Spring when I have 4 Saanens milking. Generally I make soft cheese. Tasty and makes great sub for ricotta in lasagna. If you let it sit in the brine longer, drain it longer. you will get a dryer cheese that will slice when chiled. Won't melt if heated.

    My Nubian gives more butterfat and tastes different than the Saanens do. The mini Nubs (part Nigerian) also give higher butterfat. My Saanen is fav to drink, you do get a little more cheese with the higher butter fat on a gal but, not a great difference. My does all pasture together, buck does not run with them (....& he hates that)

    YEAH, GOAT MILK! :drool
     
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  5. Oct 25, 2016
    SustainableAg

    SustainableAg Lovin' The Homestead

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    Great information Mini Horses and NH, thank you! I will have to do some research.:)
     
  6. Oct 25, 2016
    NH Homesteader

    NH Homesteader Super Self-Sufficient

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    You found the goat lovers! If you go to the sister site backyardherds.com there are many more of us :)
     
  7. Oct 25, 2016
    lcertuche

    lcertuche Almost Self-Reliant

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    I wished we had a place big enough and fenced in for milk goats, but then I would have to be the one to milk them so I guess there is a pro and cons list going through my head. Clearing brush pro, vet cost con, cheese, yogurt, milk pro, milking con, lol. I guess its good that I don't have to decide but someday... It was a really good article though, very interesting. I always thought milk was milk. I use to get goat milk from a friend and it tasted like milk, no goaty taste. It would be a huge pro if I could feed milk to my chickens and raise some pigs.
     
  8. Oct 25, 2016
    SustainableAg

    SustainableAg Lovin' The Homestead

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    Another option would be a "mini cow" breed. I have always had an interest in Dexter cattle. I guess that would be a fair compromise.
     
  9. Oct 25, 2016
    NH Homesteader

    NH Homesteader Super Self-Sufficient

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    Dexters are cool. Biggest problem is cost. They're super expensive to buy compared to a full size cow. Then you have to do artificial insemination or find someone with a Dexter bull. If you can figure out how to get around those obstacles then yes, they're cool!
     
  10. Oct 26, 2016
    WeAreBornFree

    WeAreBornFree Enjoys Recycling

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    I would be for goat's milk. Although I have yet to try it. Wonder if Sprouts might have it? Lol I'll look for a farm nearby, perhaps.

    I don't drink cows milk but really enjoy almond milk as a substitute. Depending on how many almonds it takes to crush for milk every week, this may not be feasible when the goal is to be self sufficient.

    Interesting thread. Now I'll go research what it would take to have a constant supply of almond milk (if possible.) Wish me luck trying out goats milk!
     

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