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Does Queso Fresco melt?

Discussion in 'The Homestead Kitchen - Recipes Etc' started by RedneckWoman, Mar 6, 2010.

  1. Mar 6, 2010
    RedneckWoman

    RedneckWoman Enjoys Recycling

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    I made queso fresco on Wednesday using the Fiasco Farms recipe. I was thinking it would melt but mine is just not melting. It's driving me crazy. It has a nice flavor and we'll use it, but I was hoping to use it on quesadillas or something fake mexicanish. (Oh, and I followed the recipe pretty closely.) Do you think I messed up or does this kind of cheese not melt?
     
  2. Mar 6, 2010
    dragonlaurel

    dragonlaurel Improvising a more SS life

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    The website said it might be rubbery before it ages enough. Maybe just give it more time and try again. This sounds really cool.
     
  3. Mar 6, 2010
    Ldychef2k

    Ldychef2k Survival Chef

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    IIRC, aged Mexican cheeses are more apt to melt than fresh. Queso asadero is a popular melting cheese and is reminiscent of Monterey jack. Another melter is queso manchego. There is actually a queso quesadilla, which is more of a hybrid and used, as the title implies, for such applications as quesadillas.

    These cheeses are readily available here in California, but I don't know a thing about how the home cheesemaker would go about making them.
     
  4. Mar 10, 2010
    mrs.puff

    mrs.puff Lovin' The Homestead

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    Queso Fresco does not melt. It will get soft, but not melty.
     
  5. Mar 10, 2010
    RedneckWoman

    RedneckWoman Enjoys Recycling

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    I keep testing it every day and you're right! It does get softer but does not melt. My impression from the fiasco farms site was that it would melt. Oh well. :p Thanks for letting me know though because I would probably keep going on like this forever daily cutting off a slice and trying to melt it.
     
  6. Mar 11, 2010
    patandchickens

    patandchickens Crazy Cat Lady

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    The whole point of queso fresco (as the term is usually used in the US) is that it WON'T melt. You can sautee it, use it in chunks in/on hot dishes, it will soften a bit but stay solid.

    Pat
     
  7. Mar 11, 2010
    RedneckWoman

    RedneckWoman Enjoys Recycling

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    Okay. See I thought queso blanco was more like paneer and didn't melt but queso fresco did melt. :/ Maybe I'll just stick with making cheddar from now on. :p
     
  8. Aug 3, 2018
    Rev Joe

    Rev Joe Sustainable Newbie

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    If you like the flavor of the cheese but want it to melt then use Rennet. I suspect your recipe called for a bit if vinegar or other acidic agent to make the curds. Cheeses made by using acids typically either will not melt at all or will only melt under rather extreme conditions. Cheeses made with Rennet all tend to melt fairly easily. :)

    SO! If you like the flavor of the cheese...... use Rennet if you want to melt it into or on top of other ingredients........ but if you want the cheese to stand up well to heat and not become a melty mess..... use an acid like vinegar or lemon juice. Expect the same flavor but a different result when cooking.
     
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  9. Aug 3, 2018
    frustratedearthmother

    frustratedearthmother Sustainability Master

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    Good to know. :) Thanks for waking up an old thread with new information!

    And, welcome to SS!
     
    Rev Joe likes this.
  10. Aug 4, 2018
    sumi

    sumi Sustainability Master Administrator

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    Thanks for the info @Rev Joe and welcome to SS!
     

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