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Food plots.

Discussion in 'Hunting & Fishing' started by CJ1, May 16, 2016.

  1. May 16, 2016
    CJ1

    CJ1 Almost Self-Reliant

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    I'm curious to know how many others on this site maintain a food plot for their wildlife? I'd also like to hear what all you folks plant in them? Are you focusing on summer and fall feeding or late fall winter feeding or if you plant for all four seasons.

    I really look forward to hearing everyone's opinions and methods.
     
  2. May 17, 2016
    frustratedearthmother

    frustratedearthmother Sustainability Master

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    While we do have wildlife around here...not too many of the 4-footed persuasion come around. My LGD keeps em away. My neighbors feed the birds...tons of bird feeders and they asked me once why I didn't feed them too. I laughed and said 'look around, there are as many birds on my side of the fence as there are on your side'. That's because they wild birds eat anything that is left over around here. My chickens don't get all their feed sometimes and the goats will leave an oat or two behind. I've got tons of birds here....and the occasional bunny that tries to sneak in the garden. But, mostly the wildlife that is getting fat and happy at my expense is RATS! I hate rats! They sneak in the barn and grab food right out from under the goats nose. Thankfully, there are fewer of them now that I moved the feed out of the barn - AND - because Gracie (the English shepherd) is a superb ratter!
     
    Last edited: May 17, 2016
  3. May 17, 2016
    CJ1

    CJ1 Almost Self-Reliant

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    Interesting.

    As an aside. Rats are more nutritious ounce for ounce than beef.
     
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  4. May 17, 2016
    frustratedearthmother

    frustratedearthmother Sustainability Master

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    That's weird because my dogs won't eat rat. Gracie will eat the tiny pink wigglies, but not the big ones. I would probably try one if I HAD to...but only if I HAD to. I did watch an episode of "naked and afraid" where the guy ate rat. He proclaimed it tasty!
     
  5. May 17, 2016
    CJ1

    CJ1 Almost Self-Reliant

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    Dad took me camping on one of the smaller islands on the outer banks when we lived in NC. In addition to fish he killed a couple rats and cooked them on a spit. It was really good. Really really good. It was almost like there was the perfect amount of fat to meat to get that good moist flavor.

    From what I've read though. Field mice field rats and other rodents that are out In the open end up being less numerous. So there's less inbreeding and end up healthier.

    Dogs are smart when it comes to disease even though they are nature's garbage disposal. Maybe your pup knows when they're diseased and when they're not. The pinkies might be inbred but haven't been alive long enough to have become diseased.

    ???

    Anyway.

    We did multiple food plots when we bought our land. That way we cover all the seasons. And all of them have some root plants in them. We are in the uppers surrounded by corn and bean fields. So the deer population tend to move to the bottoms after harvest time. My boy's lease land was also in the uppers in the next county. And having a good portion of purple top raddishes and what not seemed to keep a good number of them around throughout the winter. It even seemed to keep some of the smaller critters active later in the winter during daylight too.
     
  6. May 17, 2016
    frustratedearthmother

    frustratedearthmother Sustainability Master

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    I do sometimes wish we were in a more rural area where the deer would feel free to come just a little bit closer! Not close enough to eat my garden, of course...but just within range, lol. Venison is one of my favorite meats. :drool
     
  7. May 17, 2016
    CJ1

    CJ1 Almost Self-Reliant

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    If you work at it you can get there.

    But good plots don't just benefit the deer. Every wild animal benefits.

    On his lease land we had more phesant and rabbit than all the surrounding properties. Then there were all the other small critters that aren't normally game animals. But they bring other animals in. The whole food chain thing. But you have to make sure that you don't condense your plot or plots so tight that it becomes artificial. Know what I mean?
     
  8. May 18, 2016
    Beekissed

    Beekissed Mountain Sage

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    Usually we plant white dutch clover and winter wheat for the deer and turkeys. We have plenty of oak trees to provide mast but sometimes they have a bad year. We have persimmon trees, blackberry thickets and we planted 4 more apple trees this spring. Got two peach trees as well.

    Come fall, if we have a good apple crop, we will share with the wildlife....they will come right into the yard by our coop and eat from the pile left for the dogs and chickens as well.

    This year, in this area, most of the apple trees didn't set any blossom...too warm of a winter.
     
  9. May 18, 2016
    Mini Horses

    Mini Horses Super Self-Sufficient

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    I live surrounded by several hundred acres of crop land & some hay fields. Never need to plant anything for the wild ones as they eat from the growing and glean after harvests....wheat, corn, cotton, milo, soybean, mainly. One side I have about 12 acres, other 50 and front 40. Woods surround and the deer give me a show every morning & evening. Wild turkey are abundant. So, I don't need to help them, LOL. I do buy and plant strips in my pastures with the "food plot" mixes that are sold to seed for the deer, mixing in some extra turnips, grazing alfalfa, etc. My animals get to rotate thru the pastures and each picks their own "fav".

    Several hundred in crops behind the strip of woods behind me. Well fed animals around my area. Good hunting but, I don't.
     
    Last edited: May 19, 2016
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  10. May 19, 2016
    Britesea

    Britesea Sustainability Master

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    Rats have more meat, but Farley Mowat (author of Never Cry Wolf) ate mice with no trouble.
    We only have a half acre so not much room to grow stuff for wild animals. I am starting hedgerows all around though, and the berries are relished by many birds.
     

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