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Food plots.

Discussion in 'Hunting & Fishing' started by CJ1, May 16, 2016.

  1. May 19, 2016
    CJ1

    CJ1 Almost Self-Reliant

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    Mini. We have thousands of acres of farm land around us. And while that is good food for them during the summer and early fall, as soon as it's harvested much of the wildlife leaves and heads to the bottoms down by the river.
     
  2. May 19, 2016
    Mini Horses

    Mini Horses Super Self-Sufficient

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    River here is about 6 miles away. But the winter wheat gives them grazing all during cold and the forests have a lot of hardwood, so acorns, etc. Mine are here year round.

    Nice to see them.
     
  3. May 19, 2016
    CJ1

    CJ1 Almost Self-Reliant

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    The Mississippi is right around 15 miles as the crow flies from where we are. You will see some of the younger does and bucks stick around over the winter. But the older ones leave. Leaving the younger to go hungry and get picked off by the growing coyote population and other larger predators that have been moving south.

    As a side note. When I got home from work I took my afternoon walk and saw signs of pig. So I suppose it's time to do some summer time culling. They can do a lot of damage really quick.

    Looks like I'm calling in to work on Saturday.
     
  4. May 5, 2017
    tortoise

    tortoise Wild Hare

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    Last year our food plots flopped. DH did soil test last week, there's NO nitrogen in the soil. NONE. :eek: He bought fertilizer.

    We plan to plant alfalfa, kale, and sunflowers in food plots. Sunflower because the ground squirrels eat sunflower seed out of the garden!!
     
  5. May 6, 2017
    Britesea

    Britesea Super Self-Sufficient

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    Fava as a cover crop. They have one of the highest nitrogen-fixing rates of all
     
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  6. Feb 1, 2018
    Beekissed

    Beekissed Mountain Sage

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    We are going to try something different this year for food plot planting...I've searched the web and can't find anyone else doing it this way, so this should be interesting. It's a no till approach, which many are doing but they do it by using RoundUp to kill all the weeds, then planting seed into the dead weeds....then they mow the weeds down to provide a mulch for the seeds.

    Since we don't like poisoning the land to grow crops in poison so we can eat deer meat fed on poison, we're going to spread round bales of mulch hay to kill the existing growth, frost seed the crop and let the hay provide a mulch for it all. May spread some blood meal or soy meal to top dress it for added nitrogen later.

    In effect, it should/would do the same as killing all the weeds and using them for mulch, but without all the poison and using the hay for mulch instead.
     
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  7. Feb 1, 2018
    sumi

    sumi Super Self-Sufficient Administrator

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    This sounds like an interesting way to do it, Beekissed. Please let us know how it turns out!
     
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