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Foraging

Discussion in 'Everything Else Homestead Living' started by tortoise, Sep 29, 2010.

  1. Sep 13, 2018
    Britesea

    Britesea Sustainability Master

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    Oh yes, there are tons. Some are mainly for medicinals, such as the roots of quackgrass (good for UTI's) others, like Stinging Nettle are superfoods that can keep you alive in the early spring while waiting for the more conventional crops to come in. The younger leaves of plantain, besides being so good for bee and wasp stings, are also quite a tasty green although the mature leaves have heavy fibrous veins that make it tough. Buckthorn is a variety of plantain that doesn't have the tough veins and makes a good salad- it's also called Minutina. I'm planning to grow some in my greenhouse this winter because it's very cold hardy. The seeds are also edible-- it's closely related to Psyllium and has the same nutritional benefits. Mache is also called corn salad, because it tended to grow between the stands of winter wheat. It's so hardy it won't even germinate in warm weather!
    Don't forget Cattails- you can eat the tubers, the pollen, and the seed ears (try steaming and eating like corn on the cob!) Golly, the more I think, the more I can remember--- Also, you can eat parts of a lot of conventional crops that most people don't think about-- radish greens make a lovely cream soup reminiscent of watercress, carrot tops are perfectly edible- try the young shoots in salads. I just remembered Fiddlehead ferns, although we are too dry here for most ferns. The young shoots of pine trees have a citrusy flavor in tea and give you insane amounts of Vitamin C. Indians in this area used to collect the berries of manzanita to make a kind of cider. etcetera etcetera etcetera (voice of Yul Brynner)

    okay, I'll get off the soapbox now :hide
     
    baymule, sumi, Hinotori and 2 others like this.
  2. Sep 13, 2018
    frustratedearthmother

    frustratedearthmother Sustainability Master

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    I like your soapbox! You've got so much info - please feel free to share anytime!
     
  3. Sep 13, 2018
    sumi

    sumi Sustainability Master Administrator

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    @Britesea get back on that box and tell us more! This is great information :)
     
  4. Sep 13, 2018
    Britesea

    Britesea Sustainability Master

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    oh come on, I can't be the only person that loves "free food"
     
  5. Sep 13, 2018
    frustratedearthmother

    frustratedearthmother Sustainability Master

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    I LOVE free food! But, I'm terrible at gathering it. I do have purslane all over the yard....and when it gets cooler I'll have chickweed. But, I never really do anything with it. :(
     
  6. Sep 14, 2018 at 1:12 AM
    Britesea

    Britesea Sustainability Master

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    Here's a couple of easy salads to get you started. By the way, Purslane has more omega-3 fatty acids than any other plant.

    Winter Chickweed Salad

    3 cups chopped chickweed
    ¼ cup daikon radish matchsticks
    ¼ cup matchstick carrots
    Toss with Vinaigrette:
    1 ½-3 Tbsp olive oil to taste
    1 Tbsp wine vinegar
    1 Tbsp lemon juice
    Top with 1 tsp lemon zest and finishing salt to taste


    Tomato Cucumber Purslane Salad

    1 large cucumber, peeled, quartered and deseeded, then chopped
    1 medium tomato, chopped
    A bunch of purslane, thick stems removed and leaves chopped
    (about ½ cup chopped)
    1 jalapeno seeded and minced
    1 Tbsp olive oil
    2-3 Tbsp lemon juice
    Salt to taste
     
    cabinguy, sumi, baymule and 1 other person like this.
  7. Sep 14, 2018 at 2:09 AM
    frustratedearthmother

    frustratedearthmother Sustainability Master

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    Oh my goodness - both of those sound delicious! Gonna try the purslane first...:drool
     

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