Hi from New Hampshire

NHMounttainman

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1. What state/province/country are you in and what is your climate like?

We live in New Hampshire - we live on an exposed mountain ridge, lots of snow and wind. Our raised bed gardens are set down below the wind, accessible via a trail by tractor or ATV.

2. Who or what inspired you to become more self sufficient?

I'm a cancer survivor. I wanted to eat "clean" food that we raise ourselves. As a result of my illness and treatment, I can't eat anything that is high in iron. Almost everything in the grocery store is fortified with "reduced iron" - so we decided to become less reliant on industrial agriculture and factory farms / antibiotics.

3. In what ways are you self sufficient now and in what ways would you like to learn more?

Raising and canning veggies, just started this spring with chickens - for eggs and meat. I want to learn more about how to maximize the yield from our land - possibly add a pond / fish farm (I eat a ton of chicken and fish)

4. Are you interested in stocking up for future needs?

Yes - canning. We live remotely, with no neighbors. In 5 years here, we've lost power annually for at least a week. I'm predicting that at some point in my lifetime, we'll lose power for much longer. So - prep for being on our own for a month or so.

5. Do you make crafts or useful items? Would you want to teach others how to do these?

I'm into woodworking - using live edge slabs for furniture. Small wood crafts as well.

6. Can you legally keep livestock where you are at? Do you have any? What kinds?

We're in the live free or die state. We can do whatever we want with our land. (as more Mass residents enter NH, more regulations are coming....) We started chickens this year, and have been beekeeping for 5 years. May add goats, possibly dairy cow in the future.
Will be doing turkey next spring.

7. Do you like to garden? If so, what do you enjoy growing?
Alternate different veggies every year, except we always grow tomatoes - I make a mean pasta sauce, that we can, and give to our grown kids in addition to providing enough for us for the year.

8. Do you fish? Bait or explosives? HAHA... yup - mostly trout fishing. But I am interested in finding a way to raise our own fish, as its an important part of my diet.

9. How much space/land do you have or rent? City? Country?
We have lots of acres, and abut protected forest. We are rural, and with the abutting land, have all kinds of wildlife wander through our land (and some, into our garden dang it.

10. What is your self sufficient specialty? Or what one would you like to learn?
I'm a newbie - specialist in nothing - here to learn from those more experienced than me.

11. Do you do wood work? Framing, finish, cabinet?
Yes - all of the above.
12. Are you interested in herbal medicine? - cancer survivor means I've had so much crap in my body that I want to eat clean and live naturally. However - I'm a sceptic on most herbal medicines... hope that someone convinces me otherwise.

13. If you could live any place you chose, where would it be?
We live in our dream location / house. I've been to 48 states (neither Dakota for some reason) and 67 countries - NH is where I want to be. (But New Zealand's south island is a close second)

14. Do you use a wood stove for heating or cooking? No - geothermal for heat.

15. Do you like to cook? Are you interested in whole foods and natural foods? Raw milk? Farm fresh eggs? YES, Yes and Yes.

16. Do you forage or hunt for part of your food needs? I used to hunt, but all game except turkey is now off the table for me because game its high in iron. And turkey limits are small - so we'll raise our own. Bought a book on foraging - we'll see.

17. What skills do you have that help you be more self sufficient? My open mind. I'm a voracious reader and love learning from others. Little skill myself, but I'm a quick learner.

18. Do you have solar panels? Plans to use solar energy? Looking to add in the future - wasn't cost feasible when we were building.

19. Have you ever lived completely off grid? Would you like to? Have not - but want to eventually disconnect from the grid

20. Do you make things yourself to save money? Right now - gardening and chickens cost more than buying myself. But over time, perhaps it'll prove to be a cost savings. For us - it was about being healthy.


Looking forward to connecting with you all.
 

Britesea

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Welcome! You sound like an interesting person-- 67 countries? wow!

If you are a skeptic about herbal concoctions, try simple things that will give you quick feedback, like a salve for insect bites or stings. You'll quickly decide whether you like it better or if store bought is fine for you. No sense wasting time and energy on something that doesn't really work for you. For me, herbs seem to work as well or better in a lot of instances, by YMMV.

Are you thinking of heritage turkeys that can hopefully breed and multiply successfully, or just the occasional broad breasted monstrosity that gives you tons of food one time? I've done the latter, and 50#s of meat from one bird is not something to scoff at. We're thinking of going with heritage birds now, or maybe Jersey Giant chickens.
 

NHMounttainman

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Welcome! You sound like an interesting person-- 67 countries? wow!

If you are a skeptic about herbal concoctions, try simple things that will give you quick feedback, like a salve for insect bites or stings. You'll quickly decide whether you like it better or if store bought is fine for you. No sense wasting time and energy on something that doesn't really work for you. For me, herbs seem to work as well or better in a lot of instances, by YMMV.

Are you thinking of heritage turkeys that can hopefully breed and multiply successfully, or just the occasional broad breasted monstrosity that gives you tons of food one time? I've done the latter, and 50#s of meat from one bird is not something to scoff at. We're thinking of going with heritage birds now, or maybe Jersey Giant chickens.
I'm planning on a few heritage turkey's and 1 or 2 broad breasted for the first year. I started with only heritage chickens this year (10 for eggs, 12 in the freezer) , but next year will try some cornishX and dixie rangers. I'm hoping to breed/ incubate in year two, but also want birds that can range for some of their food. In general - I want to go with non-modified frankenstein turkeys and chickens.

My skepticism on homeopathic is based on 3 experiences: sitting in a cancer ward, watching people that tried weed, cbd oil, and homeopathic diets to cure their stage 1 cancer, that were now in stage 3 or 4. The internet is a really crappy place to research homeopathic cures. The second is from my travels - particularly in Asia. Eastern medicine is often based on homeopathic / natural cures (particularly somehow with endangered species). Lastly - I have tried every "anti-inflammatory" diet and supplement - turmeric, non -nightshade foods, gluten free, etc - with no benefit. I'm a sceptic...but I'll try anything. I've had both knees and both hips replaced...

Traveling all over the world sounds exciting, but after a while, it becomes a blur of airports, hotels and jet lag. I'd be happy if I never had to leave my property now!
 

tortoise

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I love your inspiration!

As far as natural remedies, I'll leave you with sulforaphane 😍
 

Britesea

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There's a difference between homeopathic and herbal. But it's technical and doesn't need to be addressed here, I agree that there are some illnesses and injuries that need the attention of medical personnel, but herbal medicine can help to support their efforts a lot of the time- you just need to make sure that the doctor knows what herbs etc you are taking, since sometimes they can either inhibit or enhance whatever treatments/prescriptions are being used- just like you would want to let a doctor know what prescriptions and OTC's you're taking.

Herbs don't take care of everything, neither does chiropractic, surgery, or acupuncture. But as my orthopedist pointed out, one of the reasons there are so many different medicines and treatments is because NOT ONE of them works for everybody. She was excited when she learned from me that castor oil, applied topically, helped my arthritic knee- she hadn't heard about that one. I also remember hearing another doctor, talking to someone about herbs-- the other person was claiming that herbs were always better "because they're natural," to which he replied "So is cyanide, but that doesn't mean it's good for you!"
 

CrealCritter

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I'm planning on a few heritage turkey's and 1 or 2 broad breasted for the first year. I started with only heritage chickens this year (10 for eggs, 12 in the freezer) , but next year will try some cornishX and dixie rangers. I'm hoping to breed/ incubate in year two, but also want birds that can range for some of their food. In general - I want to go with non-modified frankenstein turkeys and chickens.

My skepticism on homeopathic is based on 3 experiences: sitting in a cancer ward, watching people that tried weed, cbd oil, and homeopathic diets to cure their stage 1 cancer, that were now in stage 3 or 4. The internet is a really crappy place to research homeopathic cures. The second is from my travels - particularly in Asia. Eastern medicine is often based on homeopathic / natural cures (particularly somehow with endangered species). Lastly - I have tried every "anti-inflammatory" diet and supplement - turmeric, non -nightshade foods, gluten free, etc - with no benefit. I'm a sceptic...but I'll try anything. I've had both knees and both hips replaced...

Traveling all over the world sounds exciting, but after a while, it becomes a blur of airports, hotels and jet lag. I'd be happy if I never had to leave my property now!
Welcome. I raise turkeys and chickens. I like turkeys a lot better than chickens. Interested in learning about geo thermal heating.
 

baymule

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Welcome from Texas. We have chickens for meat and eggs. We raise Cornish cross in the spring. We have a customer that buys 20, cut up and vacuum sealed. Then we have plenty for us and our daughters family too. We have 4 horses, 4 dogs and hair sheep. We garden, I can veggies and chicken.

I get where you are coming from. I never had cancer or any other illness. I don’t want any, either. Congratulations on being a survivor, sounds like you’ve been to hell and back. A healthy lifestyle is the way to go! What kinds of fish do you like? What kind are you looking to raise?

Welcome, glad to have you here. Sounds to me that you have a great start on becoming more SS!
 

Lazy Gardener

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Welcome. We'll enjoy your input here. As for incubating, I find that even with a good broody hen sitting on eggs, it's comforting to have an incubator at the ready for any unforeseen calamity. That way, you could:

* Finish off a clutch of eggs if Broody decides she's not really interested in being a Mama.

* Incubate a few extras so that if her clutch fails, you can slip the incubated chicks under her. Or, if she does hatch her eggs, you can add a few extras to her brood.

If you can re-wire a lamp with decent instructions, you can build a forced air incubator that will perform just as well as any expensive bator your would buy. Mostly salvaged materials, with the exception being: a digital thermostat. Those are CHEAP!

Dixie Rangers: I grew out a batch of them a few years ago. Nice birds. I saved one pullet from processing. She was the first pullet from that year's brood to start laying. She laid a HUGE egg, was a prolific layer, and her genetics are still in my flock. The only drawback: her feather quality wasn't as good as the other birds. Most likely b/c she put so much effort into her eggs. I found that the barred feathers/yellow legs of the males carried through into the next generation (EE roo over the DR hen) to make the second generation auto sexing.
 

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