How many people here are prepared for an emergency?

Wannabefree

Little Miss Sunshine
Joined
Sep 27, 2010
Messages
13,375
Reaction score
659
Points
397
Ah, good deal then, but at a huge cost I imagine. You guys deserve better than what you get in all honesty. Thanks for your service :love
 

unclejoe

Almost Self-Reliant
Joined
Sep 13, 2008
Messages
276
Reaction score
11
Points
102
Location
Pa
Haven't been here for a couple years and in that time we've made significant progress in our emergency preparedness goals.

Acquired 2 generators and have a 35gal drum of treated gas. 300gal of diesel to run my truck.

Bartered for a small tractor to help with some of the chores around here.

P1010547.JPG


Heat exclusively with wood and have a two year supply.

15 chickens for fresh eggs and breeding.

100lbs of propane for the stove. Would last a year or so including canning.

An entire basement wall lined with shelves of home canned food. Here's some of it.

P1010557.JPG P1010558.JPG P1010559.JPG P1010560.JPG P1010561.JPG P1010562.JPG P1010563.JPG P1010564.JPG



A couple hundred gallons of water stored in barrels as well as a 1/4 acre pond and several filters for making it potable.

P1010556.JPG


So in general, we're about as prepared as we can be for whatever comes our way.
 

bj taylor

Sustainable Newbie
Joined
Mar 8, 2013
Messages
6
Reaction score
0
Points
6
we are always aware of the possibilities that may come. we are somewhat prepared - but sure could be better. I think the big thing we need to build is a good and serious first aid kit. they're so darn expensive, it's hard to build them. I think 2014 will be a tough year. the government has a tremendous amount of fees/taxes planned for us that go into effect in 2014. it's going to bite hard into our resources.
 

wooddustmaker

Lovin' The Homestead
Joined
Aug 7, 2010
Messages
98
Reaction score
15
Points
52
Location
SW Idaho
Joel, I have read those in the past. Thanks for posting them.
Unclejoe, nice pics. Looks like you are well on your way.

I was thinking that there may be some new people, or those that have had weather related issues that may have some input with things that they may have experienced with that. We are sitting fairly well here. There is always something that can be improved upon. Back up plans for the back ups. Around here, it seems like everything is a constantly changing work in progress.
 

Hinotori

Super Self-Sufficient
Joined
Nov 2, 2011
Messages
2,409
Reaction score
1,731
Points
293
Location
Washington
We do have disasters to prep for here. Things that everyone here should have plans for.

I've bought more dog kennels. If Rainier ever starts bulging out (toward us) like St Helens did before it erupted, I'm stuffing everyone into a kennel in the truck, taking the important things, and heading down to some relatives house. I'm not waiting for an evacuation order. We're only 24 miles from the thing.

If it is only a normal eruption, we have dust masks and I'll be locking the birds up. Wind normally blows away from us. We'll leave if they think it's going to be bad. You have to get out before the ash starts coming down or you're stuck. Cars can't handle ash. We don't have to worry about lahars. I wouldn't look at any properties down in the valley.

I'm not horribly worried about an earthquake. We're not near the Sound or the Ocean, so the Cascadia fault going wouldn't really do much to us other than rumble a little. Normal fault line and volcanic quakes aren't usually huge in this area. We don't have some of the sediment issues that Seattle does. The big pond out back is actually pretty shallow except for the stream channel that runs through it and we're high enough that even it splashing up won't get us.
 

Wannabefree

Little Miss Sunshine
Joined
Sep 27, 2010
Messages
13,375
Reaction score
659
Points
397
The only thing we really NEED that we don't have in the way of natural disaster type emergencies is a dang storm shelter and I have been BEGGING for one....but nothing yet. We can go to the neighbors, but I do not relish the idea of heading out to jump in a shelter in the very likely pouring down rain, tree limbs and debris, high wind, and probably lightning that so often accompany our twisters. It just doesn't sound like a fun time to me...call me crazy. :p
 

wooddustmaker

Lovin' The Homestead
Joined
Aug 7, 2010
Messages
98
Reaction score
15
Points
52
Location
SW Idaho
The biggest natural disaster we should have to worry about would be an earthquake. We are working to get all of our breakables, ie home canned foods and oil lamps behind closed, latching doors. I wouold hate to lose all of our glass items. Seems like there is always something to do.
 

hqueen13

<Insert Snazzy Title Here
Joined
Nov 23, 2011
Messages
3,544
Reaction score
255
Points
257
Location
Fallston, MD
Not as ready as I want to be. We're on a well here and I fear that most if the power goes out. If it's winter we can do Ok by running the pellet stove off of a generator. Its water that Will be an issue. I have several vinegar jugs filed in case we need to flush toilets. but the pastures have automatic waterers that run off a second Well.
My consolation is that the landlord and his son are fantastic people and have been so helpful in Times that we have Been in a punch let alone a major emergency. Being surrounded by good people makes a big difference when facing the unknown
 

wooddustmaker

Lovin' The Homestead
Joined
Aug 7, 2010
Messages
98
Reaction score
15
Points
52
Location
SW Idaho
Glad to read that you are ready baymule. That is a good thing.

hqueen13, with the pellet stove, you may be better off to buy a couple of deep cycle batteries, and a cheap inverter. Much quieter than a generator, and should run the stove for a while. It would cost much less to run than a generator as well. You could recharge the batteries off of the generator while you were running the pump.
 
Top