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indian Corn

Discussion in 'Gardening On Your Homestead' started by CrealCritter, Jun 8, 2018.

  1. Jun 8, 2018
    CrealCritter

    CrealCritter Super Self-Sufficient

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    My neighbor from up the road brought me a grocery bag of indian corn. He said it's late maturing so I could plant it the same time as my sweet corn and it won't cross. I've seen his growing and it gets pretty tall.

    But beyond being pretty for fall decorations, is it good for anything else? Maybe my chickens might like it? Could I grind some up for cornmeal maybe? I like the red and purple colored ears the best so I think I'll plant just those seeds maybe it'll stay true to color?

    IMG_20180607_232914578.jpg
     
    Last edited: Jun 8, 2018
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  2. Jun 8, 2018
    Mini Horses

    Mini Horses Super Self-Sufficient

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    Grind for cornmeal. It's good. I'm planting some this year.

    That's expensive seed to buy -- compared to some. I love the look and yes, it SELLS at market for decorations.
     
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  3. Jun 8, 2018
    BarredBuff

    BarredBuff El Presidente de Pollo

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    Looks like some corn to grow and store for long term storage. That'll make pretty cornbread!
     
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  4. Jun 8, 2018
    CrealCritter

    CrealCritter Super Self-Sufficient

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    Thanks for validation :) That was my thought also... Grind it up for meal.
     
  5. Jun 9, 2018
    baymule

    baymule Sustainability Master

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  6. Jun 9, 2018
    sumi

    sumi Sustainability Master Administrator

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    I used to grow that in South Africa, wish I had some here! We didn't eat it, but grew it to keep the seed stock fresh and for chicken feed. They loved it!
     
  7. Jun 11, 2018
    Britesea

    Britesea Sustainability Master

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    Pretty lavender and pink tortillas!
     
  8. Jun 14, 2018
    CrealCritter

    CrealCritter Super Self-Sufficient

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    I just took the red and purple seeds off some of the ears for sowing tomorrow. It's some pretty corn, but I wanted to ensure there is no cross pollination with my sweet corn sowed about a week ago which is just now popping up. I think I got about. 20' x 50' or so section for sowing Indian corn. I'm going it pack it in with hope for maximum yeild.
    IMG_20180613_232201669.jpg

    How can I tell if this Indian corn is Dent or Flint?

    Does anyone else want the rest? If nobody wants any I'll just feed it to my chickens. My dog alreay likes iti:) Here's what's left - reply here and me know if you want any and we can Private Message the shipping address. I can send via USPS flat rate box. Probably got enough for two maybe three of the larger flat rate boxes.
    IMG_20180613_233640427.jpg
     
    Last edited: Jun 14, 2018
  9. Jun 14, 2018
    CrealCritter

    CrealCritter Super Self-Sufficient

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    So is this Indian corn dent or flint? I'm pretty sure it's flint corn. But you know how internet research goes...

    Dent Corn
    20150803-corn-guide-dent-corn-stock-1 (1).jpg
    "What most people know as field corn is also called yellow dent corn (Zea mays indentata). It's so named after the dimple or indent that forms at the top of each kernel when it dries out. Dent corn has a higher starch content and lower sugar content than sweet corn, meaning that no matter how much butter you slather on a freshly picked cob, it's going to be hard to choke down. Unlike sweet corn, dent corn isn't picked fresh—it's harvested at the mature stage when the kernels are dry (though modern farmers sometimes pick dent early and then dry it manually). Dent corn is primarily used in the production of ethanol, as feed for livestock, and to make sweeteners. Tortilla chips, snack foods, and masa can come from yellow dent corn or white dent corn, the latter of which is most often dry-milled for human consumption."

    Flint Corn
    20150803-corn-guide-flint-stock-2.jpg
    "In most parts of the US, fall brings overflowing gourds and piles of what's usually known as Indian corn or calico corn, a nod to its multi-colored kernels. Flint corn (Zea mays indurata) is named after its texture (as in hard like flint), and has less soft starch than dent corn. Native Americans grew flint corn for its hearty nature and high nutrient value; today heirloom varieties are grown for milling into cornmeal, flour, hominy, and the like. Dan Barber of Blue Hill restaurant at Stone Barns, for instance, grows New England Eight Row Flint for use in polenta. Businesses have popped up seeking to reintroduce lesser used grains such as flint corn. Anson Mills in Columbia, SC, led by grain enthusiast Glenn Roberts, focuses on native heirloom grains, in particular hard heirloom flint corns and soft heirloom dent corns of the pre-industrial era."

    Flint corn Source ---> https://www.google.com/amp/s/www.se...5/08/guide-to-corn-styles-shopping-types.html

    Recipes ---> https://gingerbreadsnowflakes.com/node/234
     
    Last edited: Jun 14, 2018
  10. Jun 14, 2018
    CrealCritter

    CrealCritter Super Self-Sufficient

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    Bump... Anyone want some of this Indian corn? If not, it'll become chicken food.
     

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